Q: Why is there metal shavings in my oil filter but my engine isn't making a noise?

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Took my car to a garage and they said there are metal shavings in my oil filter but they don't know where it's coming from.

My car has 95000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

You can send a sample of the oil and/or the foreign material to a laboratory and they will perform an analysis identifying the type of metal which could give you a clue as to location. As far as the connection between wear or damage, as evidenced by metal contaminants or debris in an engine oil filter, and engine noise there isn’t always such a connection. And, there might never be a connection in your case, depending on exactly where the alleged foreign material came from. Engines eventually do wear out but such is not always accompanied by noticeable noise. The best thing to do in your circumstance is to continue to regularly change the engine oil and filter and so long as no malfunctions are detected and there is no obvious noise there is probably nothing for you to worry about. You could try the engine oil analysis - the cost is nominal - as at least that would give you further information though. Without lab results though, and an actual forensic exam of the engine on disassembly, nobody will be able to conclusively determine the exact origin of the type of foreign material you are describing. With regard to the necessity of regular oil changes, YourMechanic offers oil and filter changes and at a savings compared to most shops or other vendors.

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