Q: Where is temperature sensor

asked by on August 10, 2016

My Check Engine Light came on, and I am using the paperclip method to find out what’s going on. It came up with a 6, so I need to find out where the temperature sensor is located. Is it in the assembly directly beneath the fitting where the flex hose goes into the top of the radiator? Can you tell me if the connector pulls off? Or does it turn or unlock off, and does the sensor screw into the engine block? Thanks.

The engine coolant temperature sensor should be located on the radiator hose fitting on the front of the engine. The connector is locked in place by a clip lock on the connector housing that needs to be depressed at the top of the lock to release.

The sensor is screwed into the bore. Replacing the sensor will require some thread sealant to prevent leaking. These sensors can sometimes be tricky to get loose so use care not to damage the threads in the sensor bore. You may want to enlist the help of a mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will have the tools and expertise to replace the engine coolant temperature sensor and clear the fault codes out of the memory.

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