Q: Topped off coolant with Prestone Universal Coolant. Manual says to use MOPAR HOAT. Do I need to get a flush before a long trip?

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I had a Freeze plug block heater installed by the shop most trusted by my parents. When they were done they refilled the coolant. Unfortunately I don't know what type they used and the receipt only says Extended Life Antifreeze.

Today I was looking at the fluids and noticed the reservoir was almost empty and I couldn't see where the fluid was or see the coolant at all so I used a little of the Prestone 50/50 Universal coolant to bring it above the ADD line. But later I was reading the manual and it said to use MOPAR HOAT Coolant.

My question is, since I am going on a long road trip for moving up to Alaska for work, should I take the car in and get a flush performed or wold it be safe to do a long road trip before doing the flush? I'd like an actual mechanics advice, and not just the advice of forum do-it-yourself people.

My car has 96900 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission. My Car is a 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 4WD 3.7L V6

Not knowing which exact type of coolant was used to refill the system after the block heater install, I would consider flushing the cooling system and refilling with the correct coolant. Years ago, we just had "green coolant that went into every car. In recent years, different manufacturers call for different coolants. There are a number of different metals in contact with the coolant nowadays. The engine block can be cast iron, the cylinder heads can be aluminum. The head gasket may have steel rings surrounding each cylinder bore. The coolant has to be able to interact with all the different metals and not cause additional corrosion. Mixing different coolants can cause some issues. Sometimes the mixture can cause gelling and clog smaller passages in the radiator and heater core. They can also interact poorly with the different metals when mixed. I’ve replaced a few heater cores because they were so badly clogged from mixed coolant. Considering these things and the climate you are taking the vehicle to, a cooling system flush is definitely a good idea.

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