Q: oil leak

asked by on February 27, 2017

I try to do as much preventative maintanence on the car as possible. Today I am getting my timing belt and water pump repaired. I have some engine gasket leaks, and was wondering if I could space out repairing those leaks every 3 months (basically when I get my oil changed). I would love to drive the car another 100000 miles, but I want to make sure that my car will run.

Please let me know your opinion.

Ian Stoddard (Teacher)

My car has 225000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello. We will be happy to assist you. The repairing of your oil leak should be able to be spaced out over your next oil changes, depending on the severity of the leaks. The technician working on your vehicle should be able to inform you of which leaks should be addressed first and which leaks are minute. Being that the timing belt is being replaced, while it is off it will be more cost efficient to replace any leaks pertaining to your camshaft seals or crank seals now. Any leaks that you likely have such as a valve cover gasket or oil pan gasket you should be able to wait a little bit on, but then again it depends on the severity of the leaks. You are able to find a technician who can evaluate such leakage and give you repair recommendations here https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/oil-fluid-leak-inspection

Was this answer helpful?
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Car cranks strong but will not start - 2000 Subaru Outback

Hi there. It sounds like you've certainly done some good checks. However, what was the fuel pressure? Each manufacturer has a specified fuel pressure required for the engine to run. There can definitely be plenty of fuel coming out of...

Computer reads an issue with the oxygen sensor on a Subaru Forester 1999 2.0 Turbo. What is the problem?

Your 1999 Subaru Forester has pre and post catalytic converter oxygen sensors. The pre-converter sensor optimizes fuel trim while the post converter sensor monitors the efficiency of the catalytic converter. A failing pre-converter sensor will degrade vehicle MPG performance. Although...

Engine swapping on a Subaru

When the car starts cold, it needs extra fuel. That's just how the cars work. So if you have a normal car that is running perfectly and when you turn the key, the computer sends extra pulse to the fuel...

Related articles

Is it Safe to Drive With a Leaking Gas Tank?
A leaking gas tank can be caused by a number of different things, such as rocks or sharp objects your car picks up...
How to Check Electrolyte Levels in Your Battery
Part Part of what makes a modern battery work so effectively is the ‘wet cell’ design they utilize. In a wet cell battery, there is a mixture of sulfuric acid and distilled water (called electrolyte) that connects all of the...
How Long Does a Valve Cover Gasket Last?
Among Among the most important parts of any engine is the oil that is contained within it. There are a variety of moving parts that depend on the oil for lubrication. The valve cover goes on top of the engine...