Q: My car was rear ended. Would the impact cause the fuel pump to die?

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I was rear-ended while in a park position. The impact was very strong. Cracked my rear fender. I drove away to pick up my granddaughter from school about 45 minutes later. As we were driving away, my car lost power. Was this a coincidence or did the impact of the accident cause it to happen?

My car has 80000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Your fuel pump is located inside your fuel tank. For the fuel pump to be damaged by the impact, the impact would have likely also damaged or penetrated the fuel tank. The impact may have quite possibly damaged other components such as the evaporative emissions system which is located in the rear of the car near the fuel tank, but outside of the fuel tank, however this would be difficult to determine without physically inspecting the vehicle and related damage. I would suggest having a professional from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle.

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