How Long Does a Throttle Body Temp Sensor Last?

The throttle body is an important part of your vehicle and should be monitored regularly. The throttle body temp sensor is a sensor that is mounted on the throttle body. It monitors the temperature of the throttle body and then sends the information directly to the engine control module. From there, the module figures out the best fuel flow for the engine.

Depending on the age of your vehicle, it can be affected in different ways should the throttle body temp sensor begin to fail. The best route of action is to have it checked out by a mechanic as soon as possible for a full diagnosis. The mechanic will need to remove the faulty throttle body temp sensor and then replace it with a new one - a repair isn't possible. This part doesn't need regular inspections or maintenance, it only needs attention once it fails.

As for failure, there are a few signs to watch for that can point to a faulty throttle body temp sensor. Let’s take a look:

  • When your engine is hot you may have a problem getting the engine started. This can be intermittent rather than every single time the engine is hot.

  • When you are idling, you may have issues with stalling since the air and fuel mixture will be off. This can begin as intermittent and then become more common as the part continues to fail. Take this as an early warning sign to get it into the mechanic and checked out.

  • The engine may also give you issues when you accelerate, which is not only frustrating but dangerous. Again it goes back to the improper mixture of fuel and air. In order for your engine to perform at its peak level it needs the right mixture.

  • Another telltale sign is if your Check Engine Light comes on. Obviously this can mean a number of different things, and among them is a faulty throttle body temp sensor.

The throttle body temp sensor is a key component in making sure your engine receives the perfect combination of fuel and air. Without that right combination the engine won’t be able to run as effectively and efficiently as it is meant to. Have a certified mechanic replace the failing throttle body temperature sensor to eliminate any further problems with your vehicle.


The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Related articles

How Long Does a Cylinder Head Temperature Sensor Last?
The The engine’s performance is largely based on temperature measurements performed by the engine control module (ECM), also known as the vehicle’s computer. As the temperature of the engine increases, the resistance decreases which means the voltage drops. The computer...
How to Replace a Fuel Gauge Sender
The fuel gauge has a sender that goes bad when it says that the fuel level is different lower or higher than it actually is.
How to Replace an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Pressure Feedback Sensor
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems use a pressure feedback sensor to tell the powertrain control module (PCM) how much exhaust gas is flowing.

Related questions

After changing radiator and oil, car stalls when coming to stop. Is the motor damaged?
Hello. Stalling can be caused by many things. If the engine is no longer overheating, then it is unlikely that the stalling is directly related to the radiator repair. A few common causes for stalling when braking are a faulty...
Stalling and overheating - 1995 Honda Accord
When you say you had to keep giving it gas to keep from stalling, I'm thinking the idle air control valve (https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/idle-control-valve-replacement) there. You can clean the throttle body (https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/clean-throttle-body), the valve, and adjust the linkage, but the idle air...
I have a 2001 Saab 93 turbo automatic and it keeps stalling. Once it does, I have to wait about 20-30 mins to restart.
Hi there. Check the spark plugs (https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/spark-plugs-replacement) and see if they have been replaced. The plugs in your engine are designed to last between 80,000 to 100,000 miles. Replace the spark plugs if they have not been changed. If the...

How can we help?

Our service team is available 7 days a week, Monday - Friday from 6 AM to 5 PM PST, Saturday - Sunday 7 AM - 4 PM PST.

1 (855) 347-2779 · hi@yourmechanic.com