Q: Manifold bolts loose and possible vacuum leak.

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I have a relatively new car that stalled in me a week ago and was not driveable. Car was in shop for 3 days before could figure anything out and was told it was finger tight manifold bolts with a vacuum leak. My question is, is it possible that these bolts could become this loose from driving for 10 months or was this a miss during inspection before sale ( in best opinion) and what further damage could be done? CAr has had multiple inquiries about electrical issue from atop start not being consistent to my warning dash lights not lighting up? My engine light did not go off this entire time.

My car has 45000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi there. If the intake bolts are loose, then there was an issue with the engine before and a mechanic or someone has removed the intake manifold to fix what ever had failed. It is possible that the mechanic or person that performed the job did not tighten the bolts properly causing the engine to have a mass vacuum leak making the engine stall out. I recommend tightening the bolts up and see if the engine stops stalling out. If you need further assistance with a vacuum leak, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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