Q: Is my mechanic responsible for engine damage?

asked by on

Recently took my car to a mechanic I was having to fill up on coolant more than usual. I had replaced my radiator about three years ago because I was having problems with it over heating and a different mechanic said I need to replace the radiator. Because the radiator was under warranty I returned it to auto zone and traded for a new one. I took it to a mechanic for them to install it. After installation i began to have more problems. The car was acting like it was going to die when I was trying to start it . Because I did not trust the work that was done I took it to another Mechanic and he said the hose was not connected on the bottom at all and the top the radator was loose. He also said that the hoses should have been replaced with the installation. Which Mechanic number one never told me. He replacedid the hoses and determined that there was engine damage. Can this have happen any other way besides bad installation of the radator?please help

My car has 222000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi there. I have a few questions for us to ponder as we probe this concern. Did the vehicle overheat since the repair? Is the vehicle currently overheating? Is the check engine light on? If so, what are the stored codes? Was the water pump inspected/replaced? Thermostat? Are there any noises emanating from the engine? What is the current oil level and condition? Transmission fluid level and condition? As you can see, there are some unknown variables that we need to consider prior to placing blame on anyone. What I can help you with is that the idle air control valve has to have engine coolant running through it to properly set the idle and allow the vehicle to start and continue to idle. Also, a blown cylinder head gasket can create difficulty in starting and will be followed by possible overheating or drivability concerns. I suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid a "he said, she said" and replacing unnecessary parts. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a car is hard to start inspection.

Was this answer helpful?
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. Is my mechanic responsible for engine damage?

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: 2009 ford ranger died while driving

This may be related to many different possibilities, some of which may be related to a lack of spark or possibly timing issues and some of which may be related to a fuel delivery problem or a combination of both....

Q: How do I change the settings for the unlock door function?

When the electronic key is on your person, you can unlock your car’s doors by pressing the sensor on the back either front door handle. The default setting makes it so that you can unlock all of the doors by...

Q: Won't start after driving uphill and oil pressure light came on.

It sounds like you blew a head gasket or broke the timing belt. Over revving the engine in second gear may have caused the timing belt to break. It will not start and this is an interference engine that bends...

Related articles

P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the...
P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.