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Q: I have a loud, metal grinding sounding noise coming from the front of my car; more towards the passenger side.

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I have a loud, metal grinding sounding noise coming from the front of my car; more towards the passenger side. The noise just started yesterday. It's a 2007 chrysler 300 limited AWD. Any suggestions?

My car has 186000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

If you are getting a grinding noise from the front wheels when driving then the most common cause is the brakes are worn causing the brake pads backing plate rubbing on the rotor metal to metal. Have you brakes inspected to see if just the one side is worn down indicating the caliper is sticking. You should have a mechanic like one from YourMechanic do a complete front end inspection.

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This may be a sign of failing or worn out wheel bearings. A wheel bearing will usually fail due to pitting or small damage on the surface of the rollers or the bearing race. Both the surface of the rollers and the race is precision machined to tight tolerances and highly polished to allow the rollers to pass easily over the race with the addition of bearing grease for lubrication and cooling. Over time the bearing will wear slightly, allowing microscopic pieces of metal into the grease. Bearing noise can sound a lot like a brake pad dragging or grinding. It can also sound like whirring, whining or humming depending on how much sound deadening material your vehicle has in it. Bearing noise will always be dependent on vehicle speed meaning as you speed up or slow down the noise should change frequency or loudness. Cornering may affect the noise from a damaged front wheel bearing and is usually more pronounced as you make turns. I would suggest having a professional from Your Mechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle.

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