Q: Q: Engine

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Driving down the road last night engine overheating, started steaming , pulled over shut engine off and steam came from all sides of engine, under valve covers, radiator steaming .......did I blow a head gasket?
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello. Thank you for writing in. Do not assume right away that you have blown a head gasket. When the cooling system overheats and throws coolant all over the engine bay, every hot part of that engine will create steam. The radiator however should not get hot enough to create steam like that, and its likely it or its cap is responsible for the leak. The best thing to do is start by looking for any signs of damages. Are there any cracks on the radiator, blown hoses, damage to the radiator cap, damage or cracks to the engine, or anything else that is obvious? If not, try refilling the radiator and system with water for testing purposes. If it leaks right away without the car running, you know there is physical damage. If needed, start the car and take further diagnosis from there.

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