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Q: Cracked Manifold

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I bought my car less then 6 months ago this Summer. After I had purchased it I noticed a couple of times my car making a slight jerking motion - but it didn't happen that often. We went to the same dealership inquiring about buying a truck for my Husband and I mentioned at that time that the vehicle did that a couple of times and I wanted it to be on record however, no one had ever checked my car. Now I go in for an oil change and they are telling me that the warranty on the vehicle is up because it is a manufacturers warranty and the vehicle is a 2012. They are now telling me I will need over $300 to fix this manifold. I am not happy and I feel like they should be liable to pay for this, as I believe they sold it to me that way. Would the jerking motion be from a cracked manifold? And if so what causes this? I haven't been in any accidents nor have I put many miles on this vehicle at all - I am looking for some assistance as to where I should go from here.

My car has 150000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hi and thanks for contacting YourMechanic. If there is a crack in the exhaust manifold, there will be a tick noise or a smell of exhaust emission under the car. For the jerking motion, that would have to do with the steering system or the suspension of the vehicle. Jack the vehicle up and check all of the wheels to ensure that the wheel bearings are tight and use a bar to pry up on the wheels to check the ball joints. Replace any parts that seems to be loose and worn. If you need further assistance with your vehicle, then seek out a professional, such as one from YourMechanic, to help you with the jerky motion of the vehicle.

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