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Q: Check engine light on a lot

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The Check Engine light in my 2007 Subaru Forester (47k miles) is on quite a bit but just recently it has been on pretty consistently. I had it diagnosed and it was said that my gas tank may have a leak. I tightened the gas cap and i’ve done everything I can to try to find the leak or find some issue but I cannot. Is this normal, should I ignore it once I don’t find a problem?

Hello Jacqueline! Thank you for writing in with this question. This problem could be related to a bad gas cap o-ring, or something more involved like an evaporative emissions system leak, or canister purge solenoid problem. Since the Check Engine Light is illuminated, a professional from YourMechanic can scan the computer for codes to find the root cause of the problem. Ideally, a fuel pressure test would be performed as well as a visual inspection of all vacuum lines.

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