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Q: a/c problem

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I took my car to a shop and the mechanics told me that the compressor was bad so i decided to replace now after he install the compressor and dryer but not the expansion valve the car feel like before after he install those two parts he want to charge me another 420.00 to install the expansion valve and i am afraid that`s is not the problem. i been reading on the internet and some people think that is maybe the resistor.

My car has 36000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: It is obvious the Mechanic does not underst...

It is obvious the Mechanic does not understand what is wrong with your air conditioning system. It is obvious because if the malfunction causing your no-cooling problem was correctly diagnosed, once the work that HE proposed was complete, the system should simply have functioned. It’s that simple. But, that is not what happened and consequently this is yet another circumstance where the Mechanic simply "guessed" as to which part, if any, has failed and he guessed wrong. On a 6 year old Honda with 36,000 miles (a car with 36,000 miles is, in essence, a brand new car) it would be exceptional for the compressor to have failed. In fact, inasmuch as he guessed, I guess I get to guess and my "guess" is there probably was nothing wrong with the compressor.

There is "probably" nothing wrong with the expansion valve either because that part has hardly seen any use. Inasmuch as the shop suggested and then implemented a repair that turns out to be 100% useless for you, you are entitled to a 100% refund (I hope you paid by credit card which makes recovery effortless). A key point is shops can’t suggest costly "repairs" to you as a consumer, not knowing whether such repairs will actually restore the system to functioning status, and then stick you with the bill for their experimentation on your car. Although, they would love it if Life worked that way (heads, they win, tails, you lose), it’s completely inappropriate and the first order if business is to get a refund.

By the way, when they told you that what’s wrong is you need a compressor, did that caveat or qualify that statement? If not, that is all the more reason to seek a refund. That is, UNLESS they told you in no uncertain terms that the compressor has failed (allegedly; I don’t believe it) and they will replace it BUT there is no guarantee that other problems in the system exist, other problems which can’t be tested until there is a functioning compressor, then they have a big problem. My point is, if their remarks to you were LIMITED to, more or less, "you’re compressor has failed, if you authorize the repair, we’ll replace it and you’ll be good to go", then you are entitled to a refund. Again, to conclude otherwise, is to assume that a repair facility can perform "experiments" on consumers’ cars where payment is demanded regardless of the results. Obviously, that makes no sense, and in this instance has caused a lot of damage and inconvenience to you.

With regard to the technical issue, there is a very specific, step by step, protocol (detailed instructions) that are gone through when a customer presents with a non functioning a/c system. To resolve your issue, were you to have called YourMechanic, the Technician would simply go through that roadmap (it is set out in detail in the Factory Service Manual that is published for your car), instruction by instruction, until the fault is found. It is that simple, although laborious and that’s why shops don’t do it because your money is basically "free" to them while they guess as to what part is bad. At any rate, there is NO other way to diagnose and solve the problem and there is no such thing as guesses or hunches in a/c repair. I hope you can get your money back from the shop...if at some point in this, you want the issue properly diagnosed, let us know, at YourMechanic and we’ll get it resolved for you without any further nonsense. Let us know if you have further concerns or questions.

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