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P0693 OBD-II Trouble Code: Fan 2 Control Circuit Low

Check Engine Light

P0693 code definition

The P0693 code is stored in the PCM when the voltage reading from the electrical cooling fan control circuit is too high or too low in comparison to the manufacturer’s specifications.

What the P0693 code means

The PCM detects the voltage of the cooling fan control circuit to determine if the cooling system is operating correctly. If the voltage reading is off by more than 10% in either direction, this is considered indicative of an issue, and the P0693 code will be stored within the PCM to alert the vehicle owner to the issue.

What causes the P0693 code?

Common causes behind the P0693 code include:

  • A bad cooling fan motor.
  • A faulty cooling fan relay.
  • An open or short circuit within the cooling fan 2 relay.
  • Corroded or loose electrical components.
  • A faulty engine coolant temperature sensor.
  • A faulty PCM, in rare cases.

What are the symptoms of the P0693 code?

In addition to the illuminated Check Engine Lamp, vehicle owners may also observe the engine overheating, and reduced performance of the air conditioner. The radiator fan may become inoperative.

How does a mechanic diagnose the P0693 code?

After an OBD-II scanner detects the P0693 code, a technician should begin with a visual inspection of all the wiring, connectors, and other components of the cruise control system. Any damaged elements should be replaced or repaired as necessary. They should then clear the code and perform a retest of the system. If the code reappears, the technicians should activate the engine cooling fan and perform a voltage and ground test. This test can diagnose if the fan motor, or a lack of voltage is the problem. From there, the technician should continue performing repairs, clearing the code and retesting each time, until the issue has been addressed and the code does not reappear.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0693 code

Often, the cooling fan motors will be replaced immediately, without a proper diagnostic procedure. In many cases, a recalled cooling fan relay is actually the culprit, and should be tested before replacing any major parts.

How serious is the P0693 code?

If the P0693 code is being detected, it should be addressed as soon as possible. Without the ability to properly cool the temperature of the engine, the vehicle will not operate properly. Overheating can lead to much more serious repairs. It is important to address this code as soon as possible once detected.

What repairs can fix the P0693 code?

There are many ways that a technician can address a P0693 code detection. They include:

  • Replacing a bad cooling fan motor.
  • Replacing a faulty or recalled cooling fan relay.
  • Repairing an open or short circuit within the cooling fan 2 relay.
  • Replacing or repairing corroded or loose electrical components.
  • Replacing a faulty engine coolant temperature sensor.
  • Replacing a faulty PCM, in rare cases.

In some very rare cases, the fan motor may appear to be faulty, but the issue is actually a leak in the power steering fluid. The cooling fan motor is driven in part by hydraulic pressure from the power steering pump, so this issue can affect the performance of the fan motor. In this instance, repairing the leak in the power steering should be attempted. A failed power steering pump may also need to be replaced.

Need help with a P0693 code?

YourMechanic offers certified mobile mechanics who will come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your vehicle. Get a quote and book an appointment online or speak to a service advisor at 1-800-701-6230.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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