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How to Get Smog Technician Certified in Tennessee

Vehicle smog and emissions testing is common practice in this era of environmental awareness. This means that for those with an auto mechanic career, it’s possible to get into a niche specialty helping to bring vehicles that fail the testing up to standards. Knowing how to identify, diagnose, and repair issues which affect the amount of pollution a vehicle releases can be useful in getting an automotive technician job which requires these specific skills.

If you are an auto tech in Tennessee, the good news for you is that six counties in the state require vehicles to have yearly emissions inspections. These counties are Hamilton, Davidson, Sumner, Rutherford, Wilson, and Williamson. If you live in one of these areas and are an auto mechanic or interested in working with vehicles, focusing on emissions inspection or repair may be a good move for your career.

How to become an emissions inspector in Tennessee

As is the case in many states, Tennessee contracts implementation of vehicle emissions inspections out to private companies. In all counties except Davidson, Envirotest (a subsidiary of Opus Inspection) conducts the testing. In Davidson County, the task is carried out by Opus Inspection.

When a state contracts emissions testing out to private contractors, the companies themselves handle all of the hiring, training, and other necessary tasks in order to prepare inspectors for working in their facilities. If you wish to work as an emissions inspector in Tennessee, you should contact Envirotest or Opus directly to find out how to go about applying for a job.

How to become an emissions technician in Tennessee

When a vehicle owner needs to make repairs in order to get their car to pass the smog check, they may take it to the shop or technician of their choice. This means that becoming an emissions technician in Tennessee is as simple as making sure you have the expertise to address issues which could cause a vehicle to fail the test.

Tennessee does not require mechanics to be licensed, but if you really want to work in the emissions repair industry it’s still a good idea to get a solid education behind you. There are many automotive tech programs available in the state, such as the Automotive Technician Training program at Lincoln Tech in Nashville. Simply search online for a college or trade school in your area and get started.

If you’ve already been working in a mechanic career for a while, but don’t yet have ASE certification, consider pursuing the certificates relevant to emissions repair. These include A6 (Electrical/Electronic Systems), A8 (Engine Performance), and L1 (Advanced Engine Performance). Having certifications A1 – A8 is also a smart move, no matter what kind of automotive technician job you want to pursue.

If you’re already a certified mechanic and you’re interested in working with YourMechanic, submit an online application for an opportunity to become a mobile mechanic.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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