Q: What should I know about the anti-lock braking system?

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What should I know about the anti-lock braking system?

Your car is equipped with an anti-lock braking system (ABS). It’s designed to help you maintain control during certain types of stops. However, it’s not a cure all, and it won’t prevent an accident due to carelessness.

Your ABS system is automatic, and designed to work in conjunction with your normal braking system. It only kicks in at certain times – during hard stops, for instance. It is designed to keep your wheels from locking up, which could send you into an uncontrolled skid.

When you press the brake pedal firmly, you may feel a pulsation. This is normal – the ABS system “pulses” the wheel or wheels in question to keep all four turning at the same speed.

Tips

  • To use ABS, you only need to press the brake pedal and hold it down.

  • Never pump your brakes – this can actually make it harder to stop.

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