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Q: Ran out of oil and engine knocked, is it broken?

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I was driving home the other day in my 2007 Toyota RAV4 when the engine suddenly stalled out. I pulled over and tried to start it but it wouldn’t turn over. I checked the oil and it was totally empty. Now, this car has always burned off a little bit of oil in between regular changes, but nothing like this. The engine only has 91,000 miles on it, so this should not be occurring! Who knows what could have been damaged in there! How bad is this problem if it’s just a problem with the motor burning oil?

A: Hello! Thank you for writing in with this q...

Hello! Thank you for writing in with this question. First off, stop trying to crank the engine. It may have seized up and by continuing to crank it you will likely damage the internal engine components and make it a very expensive repair! You need to have a certified mobile mechanic service, such as Your Mechanic, come out to check for any oil leaks, and to take a look at the vehicle. There are several Technical Service Bulletins (TSB) that address the excessive oil issue. The first, T-SB-0158-14 Rev 2, dated 27 April 2015 addresses oil consumption inspection and the second, T-SB-0030-15, dated 26 May 2015, addresses the oil consumption repair procedure. The repairs must be completed in the order they are issued by your local Toyota dealership. Before these can be completed you need to determine if the engine is still good by having it examined, and once it is repaired and you are able to drive the vehicle, take it to Toyota to address the above mentioned TSB’s. While I understand it is inconvenient to constantly check the oil, until this issue is resolved, you need to check it at least once a week to ensure that the proper amount of oil is in the vehicle.

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