Q: Oil level on dipstick check rising

asked by on

Oil level rising with no evidence of water/gas in the fuel. I even sent a sample in for testing and all the tests showed as completely normal. Nobody raises the hood of my vehicle except for me and "my" mechanic. There has been absolutely no oil added at any time after routine oil change. My mechanic has been observing/tracking this issue with me for the past few months and is stumped, as no water, fuel, or antifreeze showed up in the tested sample and the overall appearance of the oil does not look abnormal to him. Viscosity and flashpoint were both acceptable. At this point, this is mostly a mystery. We will continue to monitor and I will periodically send in samples to make sure the viscosity is good, as this is apparently the biggest issue with a vehicle "making oil." Any suggestions or input would be appreciated!

My car has 7800 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

When checking the oil on the dip stick you should be checking it in the same place and engine temperature in order to get correct readings. If you check the engine when its cold and then again when it is hot then the oil level will rise a small amount due to expansion from heat. If you check the level on an incline and then when flat you will see an increase in level. Once you verify the oil level is going up then you will either have coolant in the oil or fuel in the oil. The coolant would show as a coolant loss. The fuel would show as an odor in the oil that smells of fuel and you would have running rich codes.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1,000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. Oil level on dipstick check rising

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: I have a 2009 chevy aveo. The signal and hazard lights just stopped working.

Generally this is something caused by the flasher relay going bad. This is a small relay that allows the lights to flash based upon current flow and a resistor inside that causes them to flash. When this is faulty, this...

Q: Car jurks when going slow or when exelerating

Hi Kimberly. Thanks for contacting us tonight. I'm sorry to hear you are having such difficulty with this vehicle. The lunging or jerking is likely due to the transmission line that came loose, and air bubbles or other obstructions inside...

Q: Enourmous amount of gas in exhaust and extremely rough idle and car immediately dies after starting.

Hi there, thanks for writing in about your 1998 Nissan Maxima. You should not try and run your car until it is fixed, or a fire may result. Check to see if the fuel pressure regulator is leaking fuel into...

Related articles

How Do Power Car Windows Increase Passenger Safety?
Power windows are responsible for approximately 2,000 emergency room visits every year. When a power window closes, it exerts enough force to bruise or break bones, crush fingers, or restrict an airway. Though...
How to Avoid Back Pain in a Car
If you have back problems, sitting in a car for an extended period of time can be excruciating. Even without back problems, you could experience discomfort and soreness from...
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.