Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

The Best Tool to Diagnose Sensor Failures

The Best Tool to Diagnose Sensor Failures - main image

The sensors that monitor fuel, electronic, and mechanic components that power today's modern vehicles are leading candidates for most problems that stimulate a phone call from a customer to an ASE certified mechanic. Whether the sensor is broken, has an electrical connection issue, or has become dirty, most mechanics will agree that sensor failures make up the majority of their diagnostic examinations and repairs. It's also a statement of fact that a sensor issue may be extremely difficult to diagnose with standard testing equipment. One of the best tools that mechanics utilize to diagnose sensor failures and pinpoint the precise location of the failure is an automotive oscilloscope.

The Best Tool to Diagnose Sensor Failures - oscilloscope
Image: Mac Tools

What is an automotive oscilloscope?

In general, an oscilloscope is an electrical machine that displays electronic waveforms that are being produced through an electrical circuit. Different than a standard voltmeter, the automotive oscilloscope is typically an LCD screen that is divided into equally sized squares that provides shows irregularities on the output signals produced by malfunctioning sensors, secondary ignition circuits, starter systems, intake manifold pressure, and charging currents from the vehicle's battery.

There are four primary types of automotive oscilloscopes used by today's mechanics to diagnose issues with sensors including:

  • Analog oscilloscope: This older type of monitoring device has a cathode-ray tube screen that shows higher frequencies; however are less common in today's automotive world.
  • Digital storage oscilloscope: This type of scope is used with a PC that allows the mechanic to display the electrical current, save the image, print, and examine it for individual problems.
  • Multiple-trace oscilloscopes: This type of digital oscilloscope can be divided into three different output and input signals.
  • The universal oscilloscope: The universal oscilloscope is commonly used in automotive applications to diagnose sensor issues, fuel injectors, ABS systems, fuel pump problems, compression tests, and more.

How does an automotive oscilloscope work?

An automotive oscilloscope is designed to find discrepancies that are very hard to find with the common diagnostic tools that most mechanics use. There is a precise process that mechanics use to attach and use an oscilloscope to find sensor issues:

  1. Hook up the oscilloscope to a laptop or desktop PC, if needed.
  2. Attach the oscilloscope to the sensor or injector that needs to be tested. It's important not to allow the probes of the oscilloscope to come into contact with other metal components and, and that it is connected to a ground before activating the scope.
  3. Start the vehicle engine to display the electrical traces. Although the oscilloscope is attached to only one of the sensors or injectors, the electrical traces of all sensors or injectors will be displayed on the screen. This allows the mechanic to find a discrepancy in an individual or group of sensors that will lead them to find the problem and make the appropriate repairs.
  4. The mechanic is able to review the electrical signals in real-time, and measure the amount of time of each electronic firing. This is essential when trying to diagnose a problem with any sensor; as it may be misfiring subtly – which is often missed by most standard diagnostic tools.

Having the flexibility to complete the automotive oscilloscope diagnostic examination in real time gives any mechanic an advantage over those that don't use this type of equipment. Most importantly, it helps mechanics expedite sensor failure repairs, allowing them to complete more work without wasting precious time or resources.

If you’re a certified mechanic and you’re interested in working with YourMechanic, submit an online application for an opportunity to become a mobile mechanic.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

More related articles

P0523 OBD-II Trouble Code: Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch High Voltage
P0523 trouble code means there is an issue with the engine oil pressure sensor often due to faulty wire connection or wrong engine oil.
P0701 OBD-II Trouble Code: Transmission Control System Range/Performance
P0701 means a malfunction in the automatic control system has been detected. Issues may include transmission failure, overheating and engine stalling.
How to Service Parking Brake Shoes
The parking brake shoe fails when the emergency brake is engaged but the vehicle does not stay parked and moves position when the mechanism is active.


Related questions

Q: Multiple warning lights but car runs fine

Hello. You may have different problems occurring here. Since the Check Engine Light is on, I would scan the computer for codes first. The codes will give me a good idea of where to start with the diagnosis. Due to...

Q: Recommendation about welding truck floor pans

It used to be very expensive to get a really good welding machine. I use one of these Mig welders that use an inert gas. I bought a decent one for about 400 dollars. They are really good for welding...

Q: Repair Policy

I'm sorry about the issues you are having. It does sound like your power steering. However, I don't believe this is the mechanics fault. Power steering pumps are a wear and tear item and if not maintained properly they will...