P0653 OBD-II Trouble Code: Sensor Reference Voltage “B” Circuit High

Check Engine Light

P0653 code definition

The P0653 trouble code detects a problem with the sensor reference voltage “B” circuit.

What the P0653 code means

The P0653 code is a standard OBD-II trouble code that signals an error with the sensor reference voltage “B” circuit. The “B” circuit is a specific area of the sensor reference circuit, as opposed to a specific component of the circuit. The engine drivability sensors send 5-volt reference signals to the powertrain control module (PCM), and many other control modules, such as the instrument panel control module, traction control module, cruise control module, and climate control module. When the PCM or any of these other control modules notes a fault in the signals from these sensors, the P0653 trouble code will be detected.

What causes the P0653 code?

The majority of the issues that cause the P0653 trouble code to be detected are electrical:

  • Malfunctioning electrical components between the interfacing control modules
  • Malfunctioning ground wires in the PCM
  • Malfunctioning ground wires in other control modules
  • In rare cases, a defective PCM or other control module
  • Malfunctioning electrical components between the engine sensors and the PCM input circuitry

What are the symptoms of the P0653 code?

When the P0653 trouble code is detected, it will likely be accompanied by the Check Engine Light lighting up on the instrument panel. It is also very common for the vehicle to experience diminished engine performance, such as constant misfiring, low power, a rough idle, and an inability to start. Fuel efficiency will likely be diminished as well.

How does a mechanic diagnose the P0653 code?

  • The P0653 code should be diagnosed with the help of a standard OBD-II trouble code scanner. A trustworthy technician will use the scanner to observe the freeze frame data and gather information about the code.

  • The technician will also note any additional trouble codes that are present, as all codes should be addressed in the order in which they appear.

  • The mechanic will then reset the trouble codes and restart the vehicle, to see if the codes return. If the codes disappear after this reset and restart, then they likely are the result of an intermittent issue, or they were triggered erroneously.

  • If the P0653 code returns, the mechanic should begin with a visual inspection that covers all electrical components that could be in play. The wires, connectors, and fuses between the engine sensors and the PCM input circuitry should all be inspected, as should those that run between the interfacing control modules. Next, the ground wires in all control modules should be examined.

  • If the issue has not been found, the mechanic should begin inspecting the control modules to look for components that are defective, or entire modules that are malfunctioning. This can be done manually, or it can be done with the aid of a controller area network (CAN) bus scanner.

  • Whenever a component in the vehicle is replaced, the mechanic should reset the codes and restart the vehicle before continuing with the inspection and repairs. This assures that the mechanic will be alerted as soon as the issue is resolved.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0653 code

The most common mistakes that are made when diagnosing the P0653 code come from a failure to properly obey the OBD-II diagnosis protocol. The protocol should be adhered to, step by step, at all times, to guarantee an accurate and efficient inspection and repair.

Since the P0653 trouble code impacts communication, it is common for additional codes to be present as a result of the P0653 code. It can be common for these additional codes to be dealt with before the P0653 code, which can lead to fruitless repairs. Trouble codes should always be handled in the order in which they are shown in the freeze frame data.

How serious is the P0653 code?

A vehicle that has a detected P0653 trouble code is likely still drivable. However, the car will probably experience depleted engine performance, and should be inspected and repaired as soon as possible.

What repairs can fix the P0653 code?

Repairs for the P0653 trouble code include:

Additional comments for consideration regarding the P0653 code

It is rare for the PCM or another control module to require replacement following the P0653 code. However, if one of the control modules does need to be replaced, it will also need to be reprogrammed.

In many vehicles, the P0653 code must be detected eight times before the Check Engine Light will illuminate.

Need help with a P0653 code?

YourMechanic offers certified mobile mechanics who will come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your vehicle. Get a quote and book an appointment online or speak to a service advisor at 1-800-701-6230.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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