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P0607 OBD-II Trouble Code: Control Module Performance

Check Engine Light

P0607 code definition

The P0607 trouble code marks a performance problem with the control module. This code is often related to the P0602, P0603, P0604, P0605, and P0606 trouble codes.

What the P0607 code means

P0607 is the standard OBD-II trouble code for an issue with the engine control module (ECM). The code suggests that the ECM is experiencing problems, such as power failure or memory loss, and thus may not be able to do its job properly.

What causes the P0607 code?

The control module performance trouble code can have multiple causes:

  • ECM is faulty due to physical damage, the presence of water in the ECM, or corrosion
  • Electronics in the ECM are faulting
  • The ECM wire harness is misrouted
  • Vehicle’s battery is dead or dying
  • Battery cables are loose, unhooked, or corroded
  • Vehicle’s alternator is malfunctioning
  • ECM has been improperly reprogrammed, or has not had the software updated

What are the symptoms of the P0607 code?

The P0607 trouble code will usually be accompanied by the Check Engine Soon Warning Light. The vehicle may also have a problem starting, or may fail to start at all (though the engine will likely crank). If the vehicle does start, you may experience some engine issues, and the vehicle may even stall while you are driving. Fuel economy and smoothness of driving will likely be negatively impacted as well.

How does a mechanic diagnose the P0607 code?

The P0607 code will first be diagnosed with an OBD-II trouble code scanner. A qualified mechanic will look at the freeze frame data to try and determine any related issues or clues for the P0607 code. The trouble codes will then be reset, and the car restarted, to see if the codes remain. If the P0607 code does not resurface, the ECM may be in working order, though the mechanic should still check the electrical system to make sure everything is in working order.

If the P0607 code returns following the trouble code reset, the technician will first check the electrical system. If the battery or the alternator are not providing proper electrical power to the ECM, the ECM will malfunction and the P0607 code may be triggered. If the battery and alternator are in working order, the mechanic will check the ECM itself to see if there is water damage, corrosion, poor connections, or an improperly routed wire harness.

If a mechanic cannot find any issues, then the ECM should have the software updated.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0607 code

The most frequent mistake that is made when diagnosing the P0607 code is not following the correct trouble code diagnostic protocol. If a technician skips steps, they may misdiagnose the code. It’s important for a mechanic to inspect the electrical system before the ECM, as issues to the electrical system will be a quicker and smoother repair.

How serious is the P0607 code?

The P0607 code can vary in severity. Sometimes the code coming on is a fluke, and there is no actual problem with the ECM or the vehicle. At its worst, however, the P0607 code means that the ECM is malfunctioning or the battery is dying. Since the ECM is responsible for keeping your vehicle’s transmission and engine running properly, the P0607 code may mean that your car cannot be driven.

What repairs can fix the P0607 code?

The common fixes for the P0607 code depend on the issue. Some of the potential fixes include:

Additional comments for consideration regarding the P0607 code

If your battery has recently been changed, the ECM may have lost power and need to be reprogrammed.

Need help with a P0607 code?

YourMechanic offers certified mobile mechanics who will come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your vehicle. Get a quote and book an appointment online or speak to a service advisor at 1-800-701-6230.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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