How to Get Smog Technician Certified in Missouri

How to Get Smog Technician Certified

Better automotive technician jobs are generally reserved for those who have either put together an impressive level of experience or added to their resume by specializing in something. Fortunately, if you’re working in Missouri, auto mechanic jobs are always available to certified smog technicians. All it takes is passing a simple certification test to get your license.

Becoming a certified smog technician in Missouri

Even better is the fact that becoming certified in Missouri really couldn’t be simpler. For one thing, applying for a license is completely free. Once you become certified, the license will be good for three years.

All you have to do is apply through the state for the license and then go through the training provided by an approved contractor. This is known as the Gateway Vehicle Inspection Program (GVIP). Once you’ve done this, the final step is passing a written and practical exam administered by the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Finding a training center

To take the required courses, you’ll first need to find a training center that has been approved to host them. Do this by simply calling Opus Inspection at 314-567-4891. At the time of this writing, classes are given at Building G108 located at 4331 Finney Avenue, St. Louis. The security guard at the entrance will tell you where to park and how to find the classroom.

Reviewing class materials

Becoming certified is incredibly easy, especially because the relevant materials are online. Here is the Gateway Vehicle Inspection Program. As you can see, it’s a pretty extensive presentation, but being able to look over the documents from the comfort of your own home should make it much easier to pass the exam and go on to land more auto technician jobs.

How to find automotive technician jobs once you’ve passed

Once you’ve passed the GVIP certification program and are ready to begin looking for smog technician jobs in Missouri, you’ll want to make sure you’re narrowing your focus to eligible options. Only auto body repair shops and dealerships that have also been through an approval process administered by the state. Those that haven’t been can still hire you as a mechanic, but you won’t be able to put your license to good use. If you own an auto shop in Missouri and would like to become licensed to inspect vehicles for acceptable emission levels, this next section will help.

Getting your business certified

Just like mechanics, you’ll first need to apply for an emissions inspection license with the state. This one does come with a fee, though, but it’s just $100. You will also need to buy inspection equipment from a state-approved contractor. If you only plan on doing safety inspections, this won’t be necessary. Finally, your business must have Internet access so you can carry out real-time vehicle registrations for customers. If you don’t have this at the time your shop is inspected, you’ll be fined $220. Once your business is approved, you can begin conducting emission tests at your location. Just know that you can only charge $24 for the tests and $12 for safety inspections. Getting certified to check vehicles in Missouri for emissions levels is a great way to increase your chances of landing automotive tech jobs and enjoying a better salary at the same time.

If you’re already a certified mechanic and you’re interested in working with YourMechanic, submit an online application for an opportunity to become a mobile mechanic.

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