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How Long Does a Heater Control Valve Last?

heater control valve

Keeping the right amount of coolant in a car is essential in keeping the engine at the right temperature. Failing to have the right amount of coolant or even bad elements of the coolant system can lead to a lot of damaged. The flow of coolant from the engine to the heater core is important. The only way that this flow is regulated is by having a fully functional heater control valve. There are a number of things that can mess the coolant flow up, like damage to the heater control valve. Every time that you crank up your car, the heater control valve will have to come on and do its job in order to keep the internal temperature of an engine regulated.

The heater control valve is supposed to last as long as the car does. There are a variety of issues that can cause this part to have to be replaced. If the heater valve is replaced, then you will need to get a mechanic to take a look at the rest of the system to ensure there is no additional damage to fix. In some cases, the inside of the heater valve will become corroded due to the coolant that passes through it on a daily basis.

Usually, there are a variety of things that you will notice when it is time to replace your heater control valve. The more you are able to find out about how your cooling system works, the easier you will find it to spot issues when they arise. Neglecting to get timely repairs done to a car’s cooling system can lead to the engine overheating and in a lot of additional damage being done. Before any serious damage is caused, have a professional mechanic inspect and replace the heater control valve.

Here are some of the things that you may notice when your heater control valve is in need of replacement:

  • The coolant from the engine is leaking everywhere
  • The heater in the car will not work
  • There is coolant pooled in the floorboard of the vehicle

When these issues are detected, you will have to act quickly in order to get your engine and heating system back to normal.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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