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How Long Do Exhaust Supports Last?

Exhaust Supports

You are likely aware of the fact that the exhaust system of your car is located under it. It needs to stay perfectly in place in order to work as it’s meant to. The exhaust supports are what make this happen. The metal brackets of the exhaust pipes and undercarriage, as well as the muffler and exhaust pipe are all held together with the supports. They are in fact rubber dampers, and sometimes they are referred to as an exhaust hanger. These supports allow for some movement, but not much.

Over time it's not unheard of for these supports to start to wear down, crack, and even break. Once this happens prompt replacement is needed. Without them keeping parts in place, they will hang down and you can cause serious damage, and ring up a rather large repair bill. While there is no set mileage that it needs to be replaced, nor is it part of regular maintenance and service, you should still be aware of the parts and be sure there are no issues with your exhaust supports.

Should your exhaust supports fail, there are some signs you can look for. Let’s take a closer look.

  • Do you find your exhaust is much louder than usual? This isn't a sign you want to ignore, in fact this is one you want to have checked out right away. A certified mechanic is able to diagnose the problem and if the exhaust supports need to be replaced, they can do so.

  • Take a look under your car - do you see anything hanging low? In particular take a look at your exhaust and muffler. If you see anything where it shouldn't be, it's time to get your vehicle looked at. It could be that your exhaust supports have given out.

  • Even if there aren't parts hanging down, rather they just seem loose, this is a warning sign. This is actually the best time to catch the problem before it can progress into anything more serious.

The exhaust supports are important components in your exhaust system. They hold all the important pieces in place and safely off the ground! Should you notice that these supports have given out, you’ll want to have them replaced immediately. If you’re experiencing any of the above mentioned symptoms and suspect your exhaust supports is in need of replacement, get a diagnostic or book an exhaust supports replacement service with a professional mechanic.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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