Q: Failed smog test. OBD-II monitors not ready. Needs to be reset

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Failed smog test. OBD-II monitors not ready. Need to be reset. How much will this cost?

My car has 165000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Hello. If your monitors are showing not ready, then that is because the computer was recently reset or the battery may have been replaced. If either of these occurred, then there is a specific amount of driving that needs to be done in order to get these to reset. The driving that needs to be done has to include things such as highway driving, stop-and-go driving, accelerating, braking, and many on and off key cycles. This can take anywhere from 100 up to 500 miles of driving as long as it is varied as I mentioned. If you would like to get an estimate for this, you can enter your vehicle information on our estimator page to get a quote.

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