Q: A few weeks ago, my 2001 Honda Accord EX started overheating. I took it to my mechanic 2 days later and was told my coolant hose

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3 weeks ago, car was overheating - gauge on Hot & the heat was blowing out ice cold. 2 days later, mechanic said coolant hose burst. Replaced hose & filled the coolant. Next few days after, the heat didn't warm up quickly & not very well. A week & a half ago, out all day driving around & then the car started "sputtering" when I accelerated & it's been doing it ever since. This Wednesday, I had to replace my battery at Pep Boys. The mechanic said it seemed like my 4-cylinder car was only running on 2 cylinders & might be why "sputtering" and occasionally stalling while idling. This afternoon, the car was overheating again with temp gauge on Hot. My mechanic checked under hood & needed a lot of coolant & confirmed only running on 2 cylinders. Will check it out on Monday.

What could be the problem & how costly as I need my car for work?

My car has 184000 miles. My car has an automatic transmission. Got new transmission with recall in 2008.

Overheating can damage the cooling system thermostat which, in turn, will cause continued overheating. Consequently, testing and replacing the thermostat should be among the repairs to consider. The burst hose, that is the coolant leak you first observed, could have been a cause OR a consequence of overheating. That is, overheating (due to any fault) will often raise system pressure high enough to just blow out the weakest link, which can be an old rotted hose. In that circumstance, replacing the hose resolves nothing and the overheating simply returns with the new hose installed. The most common causes of overheating include low coolant level (including that due to leaks), a faulty thermostat, a plugged radiator, a faulty radiator pressure cap, collapsed hoses, non functioning cooling fans, and a faulty water pump or drive belt. Certain engine faults, such as a leaking head gasket, poor engine running condition or exhaust blockages can also cause engine overheating. Individual cylinder misfiring is due to vacuum leaks (at the misfiring cylinder(s)), or fuel and ignition system faults. An automotive scope is used to look at secondary (high voltage) spark plug firing patterns in each of the 4 cylinders and that narrows the diagnosis to the affected cylinder(s) and then from there the firing trace helps to determine if the underlying fault is fuel or ignition. Your problem is resolvable and I suggest you just start with an engine overheating diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will take it from there and get all issues resolved at one time. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

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