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Q: Çv boot torn

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Rt outer cv boot torn loss of grease no noticeable noise's yet need to drive over 500 MI to get home how good are my chances for making it

My car has 215000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

Hi There, Unfortunately, there is no way to tell exactly how far your car will make it with a torn CV joint boot. Depending on how long this has been torn and how much damage has already occurred, this may last the entire way or it may only last for another 50 miles. As you know, the most common problem with the CV joints is when the protective boot cracks or gets damaged. Once this happens, the grease comes out and moisture and dirt get in, causing the CV joint to wear faster and eventually fail due to lack of lubrication and corrosion. When the CV joint becomes damaged or worn, you may hear a clicking or popping sound coming from this area. In an extreme situation, if this causes an axle to snap, this may also cause further damage potentially to transmission output shafts as well. I would recommend playing it safe and having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your CV joints.

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