How Long Does a Low Water Sensor Last?

The heat that is produced by your engine can be quite harmful if not cooled down. There are a variety of systems in your car that are designed to make sure that the internal temperature of your engine stays at acceptable levels. The coolant that circulates around your engine has to stay at a certain level in order to do its job. The low water sensor is designed to make sure that the right level of coolant stays in your engine. If the coolant level does drop below where it is supposed to be, this sensor will kick on and alert you that there is an issue. This sensor is operational every time that you turn on your vehicle.

When the coolant in your engine is low, you will see that the low coolant light in illuminated on your instrument cluster. Ideally, this sensor is supposed to last for as long as your car does, but this will usually not happen. The constant heat and moisture that this sensor is subject to is what will usually lead to it failing over time. The only time that a car owner will have any dealings with their low water sensor is when it has gone bad. Getting this sensor replaced in a timely fashion will allow you to avoid damage to your engine.

Driving a car around with a bad, low water sensor can be very dangerous and harmful to the engine. You will have plenty of warning signs when it is time to replace this sensor, which means that you have to act quickly in order to reduce the amount of damage that is done. A professional will be able to get the sensor removed and replaced quickly.

When your low water sensor is bad, here are some of the things that you may notice:

  • The Coolant Light is always on
  • The car is running hot without any warning
  • The heat readings from the engine are inconsistent

With all of the warning signs that you will notice when you have a bad low water sensor, there is no reason to delay in regards to getting it repaired. Addressing this repair issue is a job that is best suited for a professional.


The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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