Q: Tire lug nuts are extremely hot after driving. Is this normal?

asked by on

Is it normal for tire lug nuts to be extremely hot after driving?

My car has 125000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

If the brakes have been applied, heat will be conducted from the rotor to the wheel and thence to the lug nuts. However, the braking has to be fairly significant and continuous, such as in stop and go driving, for the wheel itself and the lug nuts to get hot. If you are driving on the highway, with your foot off the brake pedal, and pull off into a rest area, the lug nuts and wheel should be cool to the touch. Indeed, if you stopped gently enough (i.e., mostly coasting), you can sometimes touch the rotor itself. The bottom line is, if the wheel hub area, including the lug nuts is hot to the touch, in the absence of much braking, there is possibly an issue with the wheel bearings or the brake caliper. A failing wheel bearing will generate friction but if your wheel bearings are failing you will always hear a fair amount of noise from the affected wheel(s). An additional possibility is the brake caliper is sticking and you should suspect that possibility if the brake rotor is very hot, yet you have not applied the brakes much in the period prior to checking the rotor (or rotor temperature varies significantly from one side of the car to another). To resolve this, you can request a wheel hub diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will check to see if there is a stuck caliper (or comparable in effect brake system defect) and/or a defective wheel bearing. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Was this answer helpful?
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
  1. Home
  2. Questions
  3. Tire lug nuts are extremely hot after driving. Is this normal?

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Car hesitates when I put my foot into it.

Hi there, thanks for writing in. I'd be happy to help. This is a common symptom of a failing mass air flow sensor or throttle position sensor. A mass air flow sensor is a unit that monitors the air flow...

Q: Noise while idling, difficulty shifting

Without hearing the noise myself, it will be hard to make an accurate assessment for your 2008 Chrysler Aspen. In many cases, where the noise source is not obvious, chassis ears may need to be used to locate the source...

Q: My car shakes when it gets up to about 60 miles per hour feel like the tire is going to fall off

This may be caused by a variety of possibilities, however, I would start with checking tire pressure in all the tires checking to be sure the lug nuts on every wheel are tight and checking for any bubbles or warped...

Related articles

What Causes Hoses to Leak?
While the largest part of your engine is mechanical, hydraulics plays a significant role. You’ll find fluids at work in a number of different areas. Your car's fluids include: Engine oil Transmission...
P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the...
P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...