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Q: Squeaking noise comes from wheels as it spins.

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A squeaking noise comes from my wheels as they spin. It is a rithmetic squeaking noise not continuous. Comes after 15 mins of driving. Front discs and pads changed last year, Brembo brand. Rear discs look okay and pads have been changed last month in response to squeaking noise but to no avail. I notice the front brake discs have formed a ridge at the edge even though they are from last year. Noise is very embarrassing and gets very loud when driving less than 15mph.

My car has 70000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

If the noise does not exist with the vehicle stopped (i.e., due to engine noise), then it is likely due to wheel bearings or the brakes. If brake related, unfortunately these sorts of noises can be related to the use of non-OEM rotors and brake pads and also the failure to re-apply factory specified shims and/or appropriate anti-squeal compounds and lubricants. You also want to check and ensure that no pistons are stuck in the calipers and the sliding pins in the torque plates are all freely moving. Unfortunately, once non-OEM parts and materials are used, and thus in essence an "experiment" is set up, brake noise can be a result. Missing shims should be considered and the possibility of a lubricant solution should be considered. If the pads are non-OEM and the noise arises from pad material, really the only solution is to remove the pads and install the more appropriate OEM Toyota friction material (rotors should be re-surfaced and/or de-glazed if any pad substitution is attempted). In the event that your car might have been retrofitted with something like high-performance carbon-metallic brake pads, note that those friction materials are well known to be more prone to unusual noises. If you would like a second opinion regarding this issue, please simply request a brake noise diagnostic and a certified mechanic will be dispatched by YourMechanic to evaluate your brakes, as well as the wheel bearings, and address all of your concerns.

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