Q: How do you check the manual transmission fluid?

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How do you check the manual transmission fluid?

Your car’s manual transmission needs fluid just like an automatic transmission does. It’s necessary for lubrication, for preventing friction and for maintaining pressure inside the transmission itself. If the fluid gets low, you may experience problems with shifting and driving. Here’s how to keep an eye on it:

  1. Park your car somewhere level.

  2. Make sure the engine is at normal operating temperature.

  3. Get under the car and remove the bolts holding the protective skid pan over the transmission (if you have the 1.8-liter engine).

  4. Set the bolts aside somewhere safe.

  5. Pull down the edge of the pan and locate the transmission drain/fill plug.

  6. Remove the plug and slide your finger into the hole.

  7. You should feel fluid at the back edge of the hole. If you don’t, it needs to be topped off.

  8. Replace the filler/drain plug.

  9. Replace the bolts holding the pan (on the 1.8-liter engine).

Tips

  • If you don’t have Honda brand manual transmission fluid, you can use 5W-20 or 0W-20 oil temporarily.

  • If you have to use engine oil, replace it quickly. This is a temporary solution only.

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