Q: Warning lights appear and car goes into limp mode

asked by on August 16, 2016

The stability control, airbag, and engine lights came on while I was driving a few days ago and when they did, my SUV went into “limp mode” and decreased in engine power. It was sudden and totally unexpected. Fortunately it did not cause an accident, but it could have and we would not have had any airbag safety. This has happened several more times before I could get the car into the shop. On the first visit, they told me that if the engine light was not amber or flashing, then it was safe to drive the SUV. It has been 30 days and my vehicle is ‘still’ in the repair shop. They have not found any solution for this problem. Can you give me suggestions and/or advice how I can get this problem fixed?

Hello. Limp mode is a feature that was set in place to protect the engine and/or transmission from further damage, and to give the driver enough time to get off the road in the event of a serious engine malfunction. Most commonly, when a vehicle goes into limp mode, it is the result of there being a problem with one or more of the vehicle’s computers. There are multiple possibilities for why your vehicle went into limp mode. This could have happened as a result of a problem with the speed sensor, the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor, the throttle position (TP) sensor, or the line pressure, shift timing, or sequence of the transmission.

However, these are only some of the possibilities of what may be causing your vehicle to be in limp mode. It is unusual that it has taken 30 days for the shop to diagnose this problem. The dealership might be a better alternative as dealerships have more access to information that may be necessary to properly diagnose this problem. They also have specialized computers that would be able to pinpoint the problem fairly quickly. My suggestion would be to have the car transferred to a dealership to have a proper diagnosis completed.

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