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How Long Does an Ignition Trigger Last?

ignition trigger

In order to crank a car, there are elements of the electrical and the fuel system that have to work together. As the car key is turned over, the ignition coil will have to let out a spark that will in turn ignite the fuel and air mixture in their car. Another component that has to be working when this process happens is the ignition trigger. This part helps to tell the car where the position of the crankshaft is. By knowing this information, the engine computer will be able to make the proper adjustments to fire the car off as intended. This trigger is used very time that you trying to crank your car.

This trigger has to be positioned just right in order to give off accurate readings. For the most part, this part is supposed to last for the lifespan of the vehicle. Taking the time to make sure this part is performing correctly is essential. Usually, the only time that you will have any interaction with this part is when there are repair issues present. When you suspect that the ignition trigger is not working as it should, then you will need to take the time to get it diagnosed by a professional.

If the ignition trigger is providing the engine computer with the wrong information, it can lead to a variety of issues and damage for the car. Avoiding the signs that your car is giving you regarding a bad ignition trigger can create a number of issues that can leave your car unusable. The professionals will be able to troubleshoot the car and figure out what needs to be done to bring it back to life. Usually, they will use the code that the OBD system gives them to narrow down what is going on.

Here are a few of the signs that you may start to notice when your ignition trigger is going bad:

  • The car will not start all of the time
  • The engine is very hard to get started
  • The Check Engine Light is on

Getting your bad ignition trigger replaced is a job that is best suited for a knowledgeable and experienced professional.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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