How Long Does a Camshaft Seal Last?

The air/fuel mixture that your car has is vital and the only way that the car will be able to complete the combustion process properly. A number of different components have to work together in order for the air and fuel mixture of the car to work. The camshaft helps to open and close the valves when trying to ramp up for combustion. The camshaft seal fits between the camshaft and the timing covers. In order for the camshaft to have the airtight chamber it needs during the combustion process, the seal will have to perform its job. The camshaft seal is used constantly, which will usually lead to it wearing out over time.

The camshaft seal is made to last for around 80,000 miles but in some cases, it will wear out prematurely due to damage to the camshaft. The heat that the engine produces can lead to the seal becoming damaged over time. These seals are made from a mix of rubber and metal and the rubber coating can help to protect the metal underneath from damage. When this seal does wear out, you will have to act immediately to avoid further the damage that this repair issue can do.

In some cases, you may have to replace this seal when the timing belt has to be replaced or if there is an issue with the camshaft. Due to where the camshaft seal is located, it will difficult to inspect it on a regular basis. There will be a number of warning signs when our camshaft seal is in need of repair and here are some of them:

  • Oil is leaking from behind the timing cover
  • The combustion process is not right
  • Lower than normal engine oil levels
  • Harder to start the car

Getting the camshaft seal replaced is a job that is best left to a professional. Due to the complexity that comes along with getting to and fixing this seal, it is much better to let professionals with previous experience handle the work.


The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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