P0452 OBD-II Trouble Code: Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor Low Input

check engine light

P0452 trouble code definition

A P0452 trouble code is related to the part of a vehicle’s emissions control system, or EVAP, that controls fuel tank pressure. This is usually called the fuel tank pressure sensor or the evaporative pressure sensor.

What the P0452 code means

P0452 is an OBD-II generic code for a voltage issue with the EVAP system in that the voltage received by the engine computer from the system is not within the manufacturer’s parameters.

What causes the P0452 code?

The most common causes for a P0452 include:

  • Loose fuel gap
  • Faulty fuel tank pressure sensor
  • Faulty wiring for the fuel tank pressure sensor
  • Faulty purge control solenoid
  • Clogged or damaged charcoal canister
  • Vacuum leak

What are the symptoms of the P0452 code?

Other than a Check Engine Light, a P0452 will likely not cause any noticeable symptoms. Other EVAP codes may be present.

How does a mechanic diagnose the P0452 code?

Like any EVAP code, your mechanic will first inspect the fuel cap, retighten it, clear the code, reset the engine computer, and test the vehicle to see if the code returns. If not, then it’s just another case of “loose gas cap syndrome.” However, if the code persists, the fuel tank pressure sensor could be the culprit. With a professional OBD-II scanner, your mechanic can look at the fuel tank pressure readings to see if the engine computer is reading vacuum from the sensor. If not, the wiring from the sensor should be inspected to ensure there isn’t a communication error before replacing the pressure sensor.

Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0452 code

The most common mistake is replacing the pressure sensor when the problem simply was the fuel cap was not tight enough. If other EVAP codes are present with a P0452, those issues may also be the route cause.

How serious is the P0452 code?

While they can increase a vehicle’s emissions and carbon footprint, most EVAP related codes have zero effect on a vehicle’s performance.

What repairs can fix the P0452 code?

The most common repairs for a P0452 are as follows:

Additional comments for consideration regarding the P0452 code

The fuel tank pressure sensor is usually on top of the fuel tank by the primary pump, meaning that unless your vehicle is equipped with an access panel, you’ll have to remove the fuel tank to access the sensor.

Need help with a P0452 code?

YourMechanic offers certified mobile mechanics who will come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your vehicle. Get a quote and book an appointment online or speak to a service advisor at 1-800-701-6230.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

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