Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

How to Replace a Canister Purge Solenoid

a canister purge solenoid

The job of the canister purge solenoid is to prevent vapor produced by the fuel cell from releasing into the atmosphere. This component is secured to the charcoal canister and the engine's vacuum system which makes up the EVAP system on most vehicles made after 1985. The EVAP system is a first line of defense in protecting the occupants of the vehicle from harmful side effects caused by fuel vapor. When this component fails, these potentially harmful particles can enter the vehicle compartment, leading to serious health risks or long term health issues.

Some of the warning signs that a problem with the canister purge solenoid exists include the Check Engine Light staying on, the fuel tank appearing full when filling, or a failed emissions test.

Part 1 of 1: Replacing the canister purge solenoid

Materials Needed

  • Boxed end wrench or ratchet wrench
  • Flashlight
  • Flat blade screwdriver
  • Penetrating oil (WD-40 or PB Blaster)
  • Replacement canister purge solenoid
  • Replacement vent or vacuum hoses (if the ones attached are frayed you should replace)
  • Safety equipment (safety glasses)
  • Scan tool

Step 1: Disconnect the vehicle's battery. The canister purge solenoid is connected to a power connection that supplies the device with electricity in order to trigger the solenoid on and off. Because of this, the first thing that should be done before replacing this part is to disconnect the power supply by removing the positive and negative battery cables.

location of the canister purge solenoid

Step 2: Raise the hood and locate the canister purge solenoid. On most vehicles, this component is located on top of the engine, or near the rear of the fuel system.

It will have an electrical harness and two vacuum lines attached.

One of the vacuum lines runs to the fuel injector rail, while the other is attached to the EVAP canister located near the fuel cell. Locate this component and match it with your replacement part before removing.

location of the electrical harness

Step 3: Remove the electrical harness. Once you've located the correct part, disconnect the electrical harness that is attached to the canister purge solenoid.

Step 4: Remove the vacuum lines. A good tip that many experienced mechanics know is to mark the location of each vacuum line so that you don't install them backwards.

  • Tip: Use either colored masking tape or two different colored zip ties to identify which vacuum line secures to the different male fittings.

Once you've clearly marked these, remove them according to the recommendations in your service manual.

removing the canister purge solenoid

Step 5: Remove the canister purge solenoid. This component is usually secured to a bracket near the fuel injector rail or the firewall with a 10mm sized bolt. Remove the bolt and remove the old canister purge solenoid from the vehicle.

Step 6: Install the new canister purge solenoid. Installation of this component is in reverse of the removal. Follow these general guidelines but always refer to the specific instructions in your vehicle service manual.

Place new vacuum hoses on the canister purge solenoid (if the old ones are frayed). Install the new canister purge solenoid by securing it to the bracket with the bolt. Install the vacuum lines on the correct male fittings and reinstall the electrical harness.

Once the new canister purge solenoid has been secured to your vehicle correctly, check the vacuum lines one last time to verify they were not installed backwards. Incorrect installation can result in serious engine damage.

Step 7: Clear error codes. Reconnect the battery cables and start the vehicle. Clear any error codes with a scan tool.

Step 8: Test the vehicle. Start the vehicle and let it warm up to operating temperature. Check the dashboard to verify that the Check Engine Light does not come on. If it does, you should shut the vehicle off and complete a diagnostic scan.

After verifying that the Check Engine or other lights are gone, shut the vehicle off and remove the gas cap. This test will verify that the vacuum is working. If you remove the gas cap and there is a tremendous amount of vacuum pressure, re-check the lines you connected to the canister purge solenoid as they may be crossed.

This job is fairly simple to complete; however, if you've read these instructions and still don't feel 100% confident in completing this repair, please contact one of the local ASE certified mechanics from YourMechanic to complete the canister purge solenoid replacement for you.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

More related articles

P2422 OBD-II Trouble Code: Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP) Vent Valve Stuck Closed
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC): P2422 P2422 code definition Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP) Vent Valve Stuck Closed Related Trouble Codes: P2441: EVAP Vent Valve Stuck Open EVAP trouble...
P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...
P0359 OBD-II Trouble Code: Ignition Coil I Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
P0359 code definition The P0359 code indicates that a fault has been detected in one of the vehicle’s ignition coils, generally the number 9 coil. This code can also be associated...


Related questions

Q: Smoke; opening hood reveals flames - 2010 BMW 335d

Sounds like either diesel fuel or oil leaked on a hot exhaust manifold or turbocharger. I would press the dealer for a more thorough explanation. "Emission valve" is a rather vague term (Exhaust Gas Recirculation valve maybe?) Still not likely...

Q: Location of evap control solenoid

According to the manual it states the location of the purge control valve is connected between the intake manifold and the vapor line to the carbon canister under left side of vehicle behind drivers door. Follow the vapor pipe from...

Q: No reverse and will not down shift.

This may be a sign of low transmission fluid or a faulty transmission control solenoid. As you know, automatic transmissions use pressurized hydraulic fluid to change gears. Every time a gear change is required, the car's computer activates a transmission...