How Long Do Trailing Arm Bushings Last?

trailing arm bushing

The trailing arm bushings join the axle and pivot point on the body of the vehicle. They are part of a trailing arm suspension in your vehicle. The front trailing arm consists of bushings. A bolt runs through these bushings to hold the trailing arm to the chassis of the vehicle. The purpose of the trailing arm bushings is to cushion the movement of the suspension while holding the wheel on the correct axis.

The bushings absorb minor vibrations, shocks, and noise from the road to make for a smoother drive. The trailing arm bushings do not require much maintenance, yet, they do go bad over time because of the harsh environment they work in. If your bushings are made of rubber, high heat may cause them to crack and harden over time. If this happens, you will notice signs that your trailing arm bushings need to be replaced. As soon as this happens, contact the professionals from YourMechanic to take a look at your trailing arm bushings and replace them. Keep in mind that if you have your bushings replaced, you will need a wheel alignment as well.

Another issue that can shorten the lifespan of trailing arm bushings include excessive twisting. If bushings allow excessive roll on your vehicle, this can cause them to twist and ultimately tear. This can cause the vehicle’s steering to not be as responsive and cause you to potentially lose control of the vehicle. Another problem with trailing arm bushings is if transmission coolant or petroleum leak on the bushings. Both of these will cause the bushings to go bad and potentially fail.

Since the trailing arm bushing can go bad and fail over time, it is important to know the symptoms they give off before they completely fail.

Signs your trailing arm bushings need to be replaced include:

  • A clunking noise when you accelerate or brake

  • Excessive wear on the tires

  • The steering becomes loose, especially when turning corners

The bushings are an essential part of your suspension, so this repair should be done as soon as you notice the symptoms for your safety and the safety of those around you.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Ask a Mechanic
(100% Free)

Have a car question? Get free advice from our top-rated mechanics.

Ask A Mechanic
Over 10,000 questions answered!

More related articles

P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
How to Transfer a Car Title in Idaho
In order to prove ownership of a car, you must have the title. However, when a car is sold, given away or inherited, the title needs...
How to Get a Louisiana Driver's Permit
s licensing program. The first step in this program is to obtain...

Related questions

Q: Transmission making clunking and banging noises - 2005 Chevrolet Avalanche 2500 V8 Automatic

Check for problem codes - you mention that the Check Engine Light is on. This could be the torque convertor clutch not releasing as you slow down, or not locking up smoothly when you reach 40-50 mph accelerating. And yes,...

Q: right side steering pulls to the right

From what you described about your 2000 Ford Focus, you may have a bad tie rod end or a bad tire. Have the front end inspected and checked for damage. A vibration is most likely a tire or bearing, and...

Q: Stiff gear lever in 01 Jetta with manual transmission

Check the linkage on it. You probably need new bushings on the linkage because they are flat and worn out. If you want to have this verified technician, consider YourMechanic. They will be able to visit your vehicle at your...