Exception in rendering!

Message: window is not defined

ReferenceError: window is not defined
    at new c (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:136:3912)
    at m.mountComponent (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:47:15602)
    at /tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:49:31860
    at a.r.perform (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:47:12503)
    at Object.a [as renderToString] (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:49:31821)
    at r (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:50:21164)
    at Object.S.ReactOnRails.serverRenderReactComponent (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:32:6073)
    at eval (eval at <anonymous> (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:173:8), <anonymous>:10:23)
    at eval (eval at <anonymous> (/tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:173:8), <anonymous>:17:3)
    at /tmp/execjs20161208-80463-1h15iivjs:173:8

Symptoms of a Bad or Failing Steering Stabilizer Stop

steering stabilizer stop

Trucks and SUVs with larger aftermarket tires and wheels require the use of a steering stabilizer bar stop in order to protect the suspension from damage, help to reduce suspension travel, and produce a smoother and safer ride. These parts are aftermarket accessories that are installed typically after completing suspension upgrades or tire upgrades that are past the required recommendation of the vehicle manufacturer.

The suspension designed for vehicles sold from the dealer are engineered to utilize a specific tire or wheel size which works in conjunction with the stock suspension. When truck and SUV owners make the decision to upgrade their stock tires and wheels or suspension, the direct results often produce what's referred to as a "death wobble". This condition is caused by additional weight and strain to the steering components and supporting suspension parts and can lead to premature wear and tear of multiple components.

To reduce these situations from occurring, the steering stabilizer stop was designed and is commonly used. However, like all mechanical parts, eventually the steering stabilizer stop will wear out or show signs of failure.

Here are a few typical warning signs that pop up when the steering stabilizer is wearing out or needs to be replaced.

1. Vehicle shakes when driving

The most common damage that occurs with a steering stabilizer stop is faulty seals that contain pressurized fluid inside and permit the stabilizer to do its job. However, when the seal pops, the tires and wheel combo tends to overload the stock suspension and cause a vibration that is felt in the steering wheel. Unlike tire balance issues which typically show up at higher rates of speed, this shake will be noticed at slow speeds and progressively get worse as the truck increases speed.

If you notice that the vehicle shakes when you start to accelerate, stop the vehicle and check under the front suspension and look for fluid that has "sprayed" under the front end. If you see this, it's most likely due to the seals that have popped in the steering stabilizer stop. This will require you or an ASE certified mechanic to replace the steering stabilizer stop as soon as possible to avoid further damage to your vehicle.

2. Steering feels loose

Another common warning sign of a faulty steering stabilizer stop is when you feel as if you don't have control over your steering. The steering wheel will feel loose or the truck will seem to float on the road, or worse, will not respond to your manual steering input. This is commonly a warning sign of a steering stabilizer stop that is wearing out, or the seal is starting to leak fluid. If you notice this warning sign, it may be possible to repair the worn out seal; however, it's recommended to replace the steering stabilizer stop entirely on both sides of the vehicle. Like any other suspension or brake job, it's recommended to always replace both sides on the same axle.

3. Steering is choppy when driving

When the steering stabilizer stop is broken, the suspension will be looser than usual which typically causes a shaking motion in the steering wheel. However, this problem can also cause the steering to feel choppy or bumpy when you're driving. This is caused by the additional travel in the suspension when the steering stabilizer stop has broken.

The solution here is to have the steering stabilizer stop replaced with a new unit and then have the front end suspension aligned to ensure proper tire wear.

The steering stabilizer stop ensures that even though you may have installed oversized tires on your vehicle, your steering will remain reliable, safe, and effective. If this part starts to act up it can make driving quite difficult since you won’t have that same control, but worse, it can cause serious safety concerns when driving.

Anytime you recognize any of the above symptoms of a bad or failing steering stabilizer stop, have a certified mechanic replace the failing steering stabilizer stop to eliminate any further complications with your vehicle.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Post a question and get free advice from our certified mechanics.

ASK A QUESTION

More related articles

How to Renew Your Car Registration in Oklahoma(DELETED)
Having your car registered with the Oklahoma Tax Commission is an important part of driving legally in this state. You will need to do this within 30 days of moving to Oklahoma...
P0240 OBD-II Trouble Code: Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
P0240 code definition Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance What the P0240 code means P0240 is an OBD-II generic code triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) detects the intake boost...
The Traveler’s Guide to Driving in Malaysia
CraigBurrows / Shutterstock.com Malaysia is a popular destination for many tourists today. The country has amazing sights and attractions that you will want to explore....


Related questions

Q: Clunking noise from front of car when driving slowly or turning slowly

Hi there. Most clunking sounds, especially while turning, are attributed to worn out bearings or bushings - especially CV joints, tie rod ends, and also stabilizer bar joints. Not sure why it would only happen while it is hot outside,...

Q: How do I steer when in an emergency?

Driving in an emergency can be stressful to say the least. Here are some vehicle steering tips to keep in mind in the event of an emergency situation: Steering around a problem or crash may be more effective than...

Q: Will the under body parts get corroded? 2003 Ford F-150

Hello. It all depends on the part that is corroded. The frame can take some corrosion before it will cause a problem. Most other parts would need to be looked at on an individual basis. The brake lines are the...