How to Replace a Ride Height Control Module

Some vehicles have adjustable suspensions. In these systems, the ride height control module commands changes in the ride height to ensure the desired front to rear suspension level. Most systems are pneumatic and the control module receives input from various sensors, such as the height sensors, vehicle speed sensors, steering angle sensor, yaw rate sensor and brake pedal switch. It then uses this information to determine control of the air compressor motor and system solenoids to raise and lower the vehicle. Common signs of failure include the illumination of the Air Ride Suspension Light, a bumpy ride, or uneven ride height.

Part 1 of 1: Replacing the ride height control module

Materials Needed

location of the ride height control module

Step 1: Locate the ride height control module. The ride height control module may be located in one of many places depending on the vehicle.

Some are located inside the dash, some on the inner fender, or under the vehicle. Consult the factory repair information if you have a hard time locating your module.

  • Note: This process varies between vehicles. Depending on the design, there may be many items that need to be removed first to access the module.

disconnecting the negative battery cable

Step 2: Disconnect the negative battery cable. Disconnect the negative battery cable and set it aside.

removing the electrical connector

Step 3: Remove the control module electrical connector(s). Remove the control module electrical connector(s) by pushing down on the tab and pulling it off.

Some connectors may also have tabs that need to be pried back using a small flathead screwdriver.

removing the control module fastener

Step 4: Remove the control module fasteners. Using a screwdriver or ratchet, remove the fasteners that secure the control module to the vehicle.

removing the control module

Step 5: Remove the control module. Remove the control module from the vehicle.

installing the new control module

Step 6: Mount the new seat switch in position.

reinstalling the electrical connector

Step 7: Reinstall the electrical connector(s). Make sure they are attached as before.

Step 8: Reinstall the control module fasteners.

reconnect the negative battery cable

Step 9: Reconnect the negative battery cable. Make sure to tighten it down.

If this seems like a job you’d prefer to leave to the professionals or you don’t feel confident completing the repair yourself, have one of YourMechanic’s expert mechanics come to your home or work to perform a ride height control module replacement.


Next Step

Schedule Ride Control Module Replacement

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Ride Control Module Replacement. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews... LEARN MORE

SEE PRICING & SCHEDULING

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Recent Ride Control Module Replacement reviews

Excellent Rating

(171,627)

Rating Summary
161,099
5,644
1,174
834
2,876
161,099
5,644
1,174
834
2,876

Robert

22 years of experience
279 reviews
Robert
22 years of experience
Mazda Miata L4-1.6L - Clutch Master Cylinder - Fort Worth, Texas
Great experience, he was friendly, knowledgeable, and did an awesome job on my vehicle.
Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Classic - Initial Safety Inspection - North Richland Hills, Texas
Very professional and pleasant to speak with. Knowledge was outstanding!

Arturo

27 years of experience
303 reviews
Arturo
27 years of experience
Kia Spectra5 L4-2.0L - Oxygen Sensor Replacement (Front/Upper/Upstream, Rear/Lower/Downstream) - San Diego, California
He did the work efficiently and cleanly. Very punctual, professional and friendly. I would ask for him again.
Toyota FJ Cruiser - Oil Change - San Diego, California
Arturo is a great mechanic and is always super easy to work with!

Peter

43 years of experience
1321 reviews
Peter
43 years of experience
Toyota Sienna V6-3.5L - Squealing noise from brakes - Phoenix, Arizona
He is the best mechanic! We don't want anyone else now that we have experienced Peter.

Mario

20 years of experience
110 reviews
Mario
20 years of experience
Nissan Xterra V6-4.0L - Brake System Inspection - Naples, Florida
Great

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Related articles

How Long Do Suspension Springs Last?
Most cars today have shocks in the rear and spring/strut assemblies in the front. Both struts and shocks work very similarly, and the...
How to Replace Your Car's Drag Link
Drag links are an important part of your cars steering and suspension systems. Common signs of failure include loose steering and uneven tire wear.
How to Troubleshoot a Car Pulling to One Side
If your car pulls to the left or leans to one side, check that your tires are all the same size, suspension parts are even, and if springs are bent.

Related questions

Steering wheel gets stuck left, grinding noise - 2004 Dodge Ram 2500
Hello. It sounds like the steering gear box and/or the power steering pump is going bad. The steering gear box is what is allowing the wheels to turn left and right when using the steering wheel. There are gears and...
The back tires keep wearing out, so is it the back struts I have to replace?
If the rear of the vehicle seems unstable going over bumps and the tires have a lumpy wear pattern on them, it is likely the rear shock absorbers have a problem. You should have a technician inspect the function of...
Why do I hear a squeak on the upper front side of my car when I go over driveways for example?
Hi Fabian. Thanks for contacting us today. There are several front end and steering components that depend on proper lubrication of bearings or bushings that could be causing the noise you are hearing. Some of the common culprits of these...

How can we help?

Our service team is available 7 days a week, Monday - Friday from 6 AM to 5 PM PST, Saturday - Sunday 7 AM - 4 PM PST.

1 (855) 347-2779 · hi@yourmechanic.com