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How to Replace a Ride Height Control Module

suspension system in a car

Some vehicles have adjustable suspensions. In these systems, the ride height control module commands changes in the ride height to ensure the desired front to rear suspension level. Most systems are pneumatic and the control module receives input from various sensors, such as the height sensors, vehicle speed sensors, steering angle sensor, yaw rate sensor and brake pedal switch. It then uses this information to determine control of the air compressor motor and system solenoids to raise and lower the vehicle. Common signs of failure include the illumination of the Air Ride Suspension Light, a bumpy ride, or uneven ride height.

Part 1 of 1: Replacing the ride height control module

Materials Needed

location of the ride height control module

Step 1: Locate the ride height control module. The ride height control module may be located in one of many places depending on the vehicle.

Some are located inside the dash, some on the inner fender, or under the vehicle. Consult the factory repair information if you have a hard time locating your module.

  • Note: This process varies between vehicles. Depending on the design, there may be many items that need to be removed first to access the module.

disconnecting the negative battery cable

Step 2: Disconnect the negative battery cable. Disconnect the negative battery cable and set it aside.

removing the electrical connector

Step 3: Remove the control module electrical connector(s). Remove the control module electrical connector(s) by pushing down on the tab and pulling it off.

Some connectors may also have tabs that need to be pried back using a small flathead screwdriver.

removing the control module fastener

Step 4: Remove the control module fasteners. Using a screwdriver or ratchet, remove the fasteners that secure the control module to the vehicle.

removing the control module

Step 5: Remove the control module. Remove the control module from the vehicle.

installing the new control module

Step 6: Mount the new seat switch in position.

reinstalling the electrical connector

Step 7: Reinstall the electrical connector(s). Make sure they are attached as before.

Step 8: Reinstall the control module fasteners.

reconnect the negative battery cable

Step 9: Reconnect the negative battery cable. Make sure to tighten it down.

If this seems like a job you’d prefer to leave to the professionals or you don’t feel confident completing the repair yourself, have one of YourMechanic’s expert mechanics come to your home or work to perform a ride height control module replacement.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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