Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement at your home or office.

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Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement Service

How much does a Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement cost?

On average, the cost for a Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement is $204 with $14 for parts and $190 for labor. Prices may vary depending on your location.

CarServiceEstimateShop/Dealer Price
2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$258.96Shop/Dealer Price$316.21 - $375.45
2004 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$218.96Shop/Dealer Price$276.30 - $335.61
2003 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$218.96Shop/Dealer Price$276.29 - $335.59
2006 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$218.96Shop/Dealer Price$276.18 - $335.40
2005 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$218.96Shop/Dealer Price$276.37 - $335.73
2001 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMGV8-5.5LService typeFront Crankshaft Seal ReplacementEstimate$218.96Shop/Dealer Price$276.29 - $335.59
Show example Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement prices

What is the Front Crankshaft Seal all about?

A number of mechanisms must work together to make your vehicle move forward. One of the most important is the crankshaft, which converts rotary into linear motion; i.e., it transforms the force created by the engine's pistons moving up and down into a force that moves in a circular motion that causes a car’s wheel to turn. Enclosed in what’s called a crankcase—the largest cavity in the engine block, just below the cylinders—the crankshaft must be completely lubricated, essentially submerged in oil, to spin nearly friction-free and do its job properly.

Consequently, there are seals located at either end of the crankshaft that allow it to spin freely and keep engine oil from escaping the engine block, as well as prevent contaminants and other debris from entering and causing damage to the mechanism. Since there are two ends of the crankshaft, there are two types of seals: the front crankshaft seal and the rear crankshaft seal, also known as the front main and rear main seals.

Keep in mind:

  • Loss of oil will eventually cause serious internal engine damage.
  • Inspect the sealing surface of the crankshaft or the crankshaft pulley (depending on the engine design) for damage when replacing the crankshaft seal.
  • Oil degrades rubber components.

How it's done:

  • The vehicle is raised and supported on jack stands
  • The crankshaft damper and timing belt is removed
  • The crankshaft seal is removed and a new one installed
  • The timing belt and cover along with crankshaft damper is reinstalled
  • The engine accessory belts are installed and the vehicle is lowered off of the jack stands

Our recommendation:

One of the most important parts of your car, crankshaft seals are typically made from a durable material, such as a synthetic rubber or silicone, designed to handle the extreme pressure and temperatures as well as the caustic chemicals in your engine oil. Because they are exposed to such abuse, main seals are subject to a lot of wear and tear. And whether you are talking a front or rear main seal, replacement is the only cure when one malfunctions.

The good news is that the seals are relatively inexpensive components. The bad news is that neither is easy to replace.

Front seal: The front seal is located behind the main pulley that drives all the belts, which is, of course, always spinning. The main pulley throws any leaking oil out in a big circle. It can get thrown up on the alternator, steering pump, belts, in short anything attached to the front of the engine and cause a real mess and eventually some serious damage. Consequently, it has to be removed along with many of the components attached to the front of the block to replace the front main seal.

Rear seal: The rear crankshaft seal is placed along with the transmission; therefore, the process of replacing it requires the removal of transmission, as well as the clutch and flywheel assembly. This is a very involved job.

What common symptoms indicate you may need to replace the Front Crankshaft Seal?

  • Oil leaking from the front crank pulley.
  • Oil dripping from the bottom of the clutch housing, where the block and transmission meet.
  • Clutch slip caused by oil spraying on the clutch.

How important is this service?

Letting either crankshaft seal continue to leak can be detrimental to your vehicle’s continued operation. Besides the maladies caused by driving around with little to no oil flowing in the engine, the faulty seal will be spread oil through the engine bay and undercarriage of your car as you drive, a mess that is difficult to clean up and can be a fire hazard. Replacing is better addressed sooner than later.

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Bob

30 years of experience
42 reviews
Bob
30 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG V8-5.5L - Serpentine/Drive Belt Replacement - San Diego, California
Bob assessed the situation, grabbed his tools, completed the job efficiently, checked his work, even arrived early. Great overall experience.

Kenneth

20 years of experience
775 reviews
Kenneth
20 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG V8-5.5L - Oil Change - Los Angeles, California
Ken arrived early & finished ahead of time. He gave me a thorough and thoughtful report, leaving me grateful for his service.

Corey

27 years of experience
43 reviews
Corey
27 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG V8-5.5L - Oil Change - Alpharetta, Georgia
Corey was great. Answered all my questions and was patient. Thanks. I will use Corey again.

James

15 years of experience
46 reviews
James
15 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG V8-5.5L - Brake Pads Replacement (Front, Rear) - Long Beach, California
mercedes clk 55 amg. james came in with a highly professional and friendly demeanor, he worked on the brake pads and horn replacements, with high precision . provided the initial assessment, and instruction on what he will be performing. He completed the estimated time in an expedient manner, provided me great information on overall car maintenance, and had diagnosed some issues of concerns, with no sales pressure at all. highly honest, highly skills, master technician that answered all of my answer for my wife clk amg, he even drove test and double check all the work done. it felt like we were in an actual mereced benz dealership, minus the overhead costs for their espresso machines. and your mechanics fees were extremely well priced ( perfect timing for us). the job was immaculate.thank you so much james and to the highly professional staff of your mechanic.com

Excellent Rating

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I wrecked my car and bent the rack and pinion so I installed a new one and when adding fluid the steering wheel turned off by itself left and right violently I couldn't even hold on to it? What did I do wrong

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