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How Long Does an Ignition Coil Last?

ignition coil

The combustion process that happens when your car is cranked is vital in order to get the car moving. In order for this process to take place, a number of different components will have to work together. Among the most vital parts of the combustion process is the ignition coil. When the key of the car is turned over, the ignition coil will create a spark that is supposed to ignite the fuel and air mixture in your engine. This part is used each time you try to start your engine, which is why it is so important that it remains repair free.

The ignition coil on your car is supposed to last around 100,000 miles or more. There are a number of factors that can lead to this part become damaged prematurely. Most of the newer cars on the market have a hard plastic cover that is designed to protect the coil from damage. Due to the all of the copper wire that is inside of an ignition coil, it can be easy for it to become damaged over time due to heat and moisture. Having a coil on your car that is not firing as it should can decrease the overall level of functionality that your engine has.

Leaving a damaged ignition coil on a car for long periods of time will usually lead to more damage being done to the wires and plugs. Usually, the damage that a coil incurs will be caused by things like leaking oil or other fluids that short it out. Before replacing a coil that has been damaged this way, you will have to find out where the leak is and how best to fix it.

The following are some of the warning signs that you will notice when it is time to get a new ignition coil:

  • The car will not start
  • The engine is misfiring on a regular basis
  • The Check Engine Light is on

Taking steps to get the damaged ignition coil replaced will help to reduce the level of damage that is done to the other ignition components. Allowing professionals to handle this job can save you a lot of time and frustration.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
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