What Causes Leakage in the Shock Absorbers?

Every car, truck, and utility vehicle sold today has at least one shock absorber (informally known as a shock) for each of its wheels. (Note that sometimes these shocks are called struts. A strut is simply a shock absorber that is located inside a coil spring, the name is different but the function is the same.)

How a shock absorber works

A shock absorber or strut consists of one or more pistons that flow through a thick oil as the wheel to which it’s attached moves up and down. The motion of the piston through the oil converts mechanical energy to heat, damping the motion and helping bring it to a stop; this helps to stop the wheel from bouncing after each bump. The oil and the piston are sealed within a closed container and under normal conditions oil doesn’t get out and none ever needs to be added.

Note that a shock absorber doesn’t actually absorb the shock of a bump; that’s the job of the springs and certain other components of the suspension. Rather, the shock absorber absorbs energy. A vehicle without shocks would keep bouncing up and down for a while after every bump; the shock absorbs the energy of the bouncing.

Unfortunately, shocks and struts can break or wear out. The three things that are most likely to go wrong with a shock are:

  • The seals can become brittle or torn, allowing fluid to leak out; after some fluid (about ten percent of the total) is lost the shock loses its ability to absorb energy.

  • The entire shock, or the piston that moves inside it, can be bent from an impact; a bent shock may not move properly or it may leak.

  • Smaller parts inside the shock may wear out over time or due to an impact.

These problems are almost always due to one of two things: age and accidents.

  • Shock age: Modern shock absorbers and struts are designed to last several years and over 50,000 miles, but eventually the seals do wear out and they begin to leak. Your owner’s manual may specify a time or mileage for shock replacement, but this is a guideline, not an absolute: driving style, road conditions, and even how much dirt the shock encounters can have an effect.

  • Accidents: Any accident that involves the suspension has the potential to damage the shock absorbers; a bent or dented shock almost always needs to be replaced. After a major accident the repair shop will examine your shocks to see whether they need replacement, but it’s important to understand that for this purpose, “accident” includes not just serious crashes but also anything that jars the suspension particularly hard, including hitting curbs, large rocks, and deep potholes, or even a rock being kicked up against the shock as you drive on a dirt road.

When any of these things goes wrong it’s almost always necessary to replace the shocks, as they usually can’t be repaired or simply refilled. Also, it’s important to replace a failing shock as soon as possible, because a car with a bad shock absorber can become difficult to control in an emergency due to excessive wheel bounce.

With all this in mind, how can a vehicle owner tell that a shock needs replacement? For one thing, the driver may notice one or more changes:

  • Ride may become bouncy
  • Steering wheel may vibrate (if it’s front shock that has gone bad)
  • Vehicle may “nose dive” more than usual upon braking
  • Tire wear may increase

Since many of these effects can also be symptoms of poor alignment or other mechanical problems, it’s best to take the vehicle to a qualified mechanic if you notice any of them; you may not need new shocks after all (and alignment is quite a bit less expensive than new shocks).

Alternatively, your mechanic may notice a leaky or damaged shock when inspecting the vehicle or performing an alignment. In fact, in some cases alignment will be impossible if a shock absorber (or particularly a strut) is damaged. If the shock is just leaking, alignment will still be possible but a good mechanic will notice the leak and advise the owner. (Also, a mechanic will be able to tell a true leak from the slight dampness that sometimes results from the normal operation of a healthy shock.)

Finally, after an accident your mechanic should inspect any shocks or struts that may have been involved, as replacement may be necessary. If you’re in an accident that doesn’t seem to require any repairs (such as hitting a pothole hard) be particularly attentive to any possible changes in your vehicle’s ride or handling; you may want to have the vehicle inspected just in case.

One final note: If you’re replacing a shock absorber, because of age and wear or an accident, it’s almost always best to replace the pair (both fronts or both rears), because a new shock will work differently (and better) than an old one and the imbalance may be hazardous.


Next Step

Schedule Shock Absorber Replacement

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Shock Absorber Replacement. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews... LEARN MORE

SEE PRICING & SCHEDULING

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Recent Shock Absorber Replacement reviews

Excellent Rating

(673)

Rating Summary
636
19
3
9
6
636
19
3
9
6

Ronald

41 years of experience
301 reviews
Ronald
41 years of experience
Chevrolet Avalanche V8-5.3L - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Houston, Texas
Very efficient and respectful of property. Suggests things that should be done without pressuring you to do it now.
Toyota Tacoma - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Cypress, Texas
Ron is an exemplary professional. He listened to the customer concerns and His attention to detail is why I would recommend him. I think it would be hard to find someone at his level of professionalism.

Larry

16 years of experience
114 reviews
Larry
16 years of experience
Chevrolet Silverado 1500 V8-5.3L - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Hilliard, Ohio
Called before appt due to heavy rain. Came early, completed the work in less time than quoted. Friendly.
Honda Pilot - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Dublin, Ohio
Mr. Larry Dust is very trustable person. His skill was excellent. I am so happy that he fix my car. Thank you Larry.

Walter

46 years of experience
341 reviews
Walter
46 years of experience
Toyota RAV4 V6-3.5L - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Tulsa, Oklahoma
Excellent mechanic, very knowledgeable, professional and expedient. Could not be happier with his work.
Jeep Grand Cherokee - Shock Absorber Replacement (Rear) - Tulsa, Oklahoma
Walter is a great Mechanic. With very Informative procedures about maintaining my Vehicle. This is the Third time Walter has worked on a Vehicle for me. He Always does a great Job.

Edvin

22 years of experience
28 reviews
Edvin
22 years of experience
Honda CRX L4-1.5L - Shock Absorber Replacement (Front, Rear) - Pasadena, California
Edvin is very friendly and knowledgeable about my honda. Good to have such an experience mechanic work on my car.

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Related articles

How Long Does a Ball Joint Rear Last?
Common signs include clunking noises and tire wear in the rear, and you may start steering to the right or left unintentionally.
How Long Does a Front Output Shaft Oil Seal Last?
For For those who operate a four-wheel drive or all-wheel drive vehicle, there are a number of important parts that are necessary. The front output shaft oil seal is one of those parts, and is a gasket that is circular...
How to Replace Suspension Springs
Replacing suspension springs can be challenging, as involves making sure all power from the car is disconnected and that the proper tools are used.

Related questions

Power steering fluid leak.
Hello, a power steering leak is something that needs to be addressed sooner rather than later, so the pump doesn't run dry and cause internal damage. The most common leak in the power steering is the power steering reservoir where...
Radiator leaking coolant badly.
Hello, A coolant leak should be repaired sooner than later as overheating can cause engine damage. Some coolant leaks only occur when the engine is hot and the system is under pressure. If you can't determine the exact source of...
A lot of oil is leaking out of the oil filter. It just pours out.
Hello. If oil is leaking from your oil filter (https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/change-oil-and-filter), then either the filter is not being installed correctly or the oil filter housing is damaged. Most oil filters use a rubber gasket to seal the oil in the engine....

How can we help?

Our service team is available 7 days a week, Monday - Friday from 6 AM to 5 PM PST, Saturday - Sunday 7 AM - 4 PM PST.

1 (855) 347-2779 · hi@yourmechanic.com