Symptoms of a Bad or Failing Oil Temperature Sensor

Our certified mechanics come to you · 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

GET A QUOTE Get a fair and transparent estimate upfront
Red-stars EXCELLENT RATING ON

Cost of Replacing a Bad or Failing Oil Temperature Sensor

If the temperature gauge gives false readings or does not move, you may need to replace the oil temperature sensor. Our certified technicians can come to you and diagnose the problem. You will receive a $30 credit towards any follow-up repairs that result from the diagnostic. Following are example prices for Oil Temperature Sensor Replacement. Click on the button below to get an upfront quote for your car.

Cars Estimate Parts Cost Labor Cost Savings Average Dealer Price
2006 Mitsubishi Galant $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
2009 Chevrolet Avalanche $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
2003 Ford F-350 Super Duty $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
2009 Mercedes-Benz S600 $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
2007 BMW 530xi $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
2005 Porsche 911 $70 $0.00 $70.00 34% $107.50
GET A QUOTE FOR YOUR CAR Get a fair and transparent estimate upfront

How to Diagnose a Bad or Failing Oil Temperature Sensor?

Oil Temperature Sensor

The oil temperature is a vital part to keeping your engine running smoothly. The oil temperature should be a few degrees warmer than the coolant. If the oil temperature is too high, problems can arise. When you first start your vehicle on cold mornings, let the car idle for about five minutes until the oil gets a chance to warm up. This way, your engine will run more efficiently and live much longer. The oil temperature sensor is an important piece to know when your oil is warmed up when working properly. There are a few symptoms to watch out for when your oil temperature sensor starts to go bad.

False readings

One way to know your oil temperature sensor is failing is if you get false readings due to the electrical signal output by the temperature sensor. These are indicated by the temperature gauge going from cool to hot in one minute. It takes a couple of minutes for the oil to heat up, so the temperature sensor should reflect that. Furthermore, if the oil temperature sensor spikes and the coolant temperature remains constant, this is another sign the oil temperature sensor is going bad. The oil temperature gauge can also have erratic readings that jump around, indicating a failing sensor.

Gauge does not move

If the oil temperature sensor does not move at all, it has most likely failed and needs to be replaced by a professional. The mechanics at YourMechanic provide an oil temperature sensor replacement service that is affordable, and will have your gauge back to normal.

Causes of failure

There are a few things that can cause the oil temperature sensor to fail, one of them is wiring damage. Over time, if the wires become worn or are shorted out, the sensor will fail and will need to be replaced along with the wiring. In addition, corrosion can cause oil temperature sensor to fail or read incorrectly. In some cases, a mechanic can remove this corrosion and save the part, but in other cases the entire sensor will need to be replaced.

Complicated electrical systems

Replacing an oil temperature sensor is best left to the professionals at YourMechanic because of the wiring and electricity involved. If the sensor is installed incorrectly and your engine runs hot without you knowing it, this can cause major damage to your engine and can eventually ruin it.

If your oil temperature sensor gauge does not move or you are getting false readings, the oil temperature sensor in your vehicle may need to be replaced. YourMechanic makes getting repairs to your oil pressure sensor easy by coming to your home or office to diagnose or fix issues. You can book a service online 24/7. YourMechanic’s qualified technicians are also available for any questions that may arise.

Sensors
oil
gauges

Fast and easy Oil Temperature Sensor Replacement service at your home or office.

GET A QUOTE FOR YOUR CAR
Get a fair and transparent estimate upfront

More related articles

P2422 OBD-II Trouble Code: Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP) Vent Valve Stuck Closed
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC): P2422 P2422 code definition Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP)...
P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...
P0359 OBD-II Trouble Code: Ignition Coil I Primary/Secondary Circuit Malfunction
P0359 code definition The P0359 code indicates that a fault has been detected in one of the vehicle’s ignition coils, generally the number 9 coil. This code can also be associated...

Related questions

Q: Shift to 'P' range display on dash.

Hi there. The transmission position sensor may be damaged or has a short inside the sensor. Check the harness to the sensor and make sure that it's hooked up properly and has no moisture in it. If the harness is...

Q: I emptied my oil and it came out way to fine and with gas.

Hello. If there is a lot of fuel in the oil, then you either have an injector that is leaking too much fuel into the engine or you have a compression issue. Most of the time this is caused by...

Q: Truck goes into limp mode while driving

Hello. The P0068 diagnostic trouble code is an indication that there may be an issue with the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor/mass airflow (MAF) sensor. The P0016 diagnostic trouble code is an indication that there may be an issue with...

How can we help?

Our service team is available 7 days a week, Monday - Friday from 6 AM to 5 PM PST, Saturday - Sunday 7 AM - 4 PM PST.

1-800-701-6230 · hi@yourmechanic.com