Exception in rendering!

Message: window is not defined

ReferenceError: window is not defined
    at new c (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:136:3912)
    at m.mountComponent (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:47:15602)
    at /tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:49:31860
    at a.r.perform (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:47:12503)
    at Object.a [as renderToString] (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:49:31821)
    at r (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:50:21164)
    at Object.S.ReactOnRails.serverRenderReactComponent (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:32:6073)
    at eval (eval at <anonymous> (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:173:8), <anonymous>:10:23)
    at eval (eval at <anonymous> (/tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:173:8), <anonymous>:17:3)
    at /tmp/execjs20161208-5336-1ywt87gjs:173:8

How to Add Neon Lights to Your Car

car with neon lights installed

Have you ever been to a car show and seen those colored lights beneath the car? These neon lights can be used to give your car a unique aura as you drive through the night.

With advancement of LED technology, these kits have become less expensive, and you can select any color you want. Depending on the type of kit you get, installation can be as easy as sticking the LEDs onto the car with tape and plugging everything in while other kits require may require extensive drilling.

With this in mind, it’s recommend to go for a kit that uses a strip of LEDs rather than tube kits. You can use double sided tape on the strip to give you more options of where to mount the light. On the other hand, tube lights typically require holes to be drilled in order to mount them - limiting your options underneath the car.

LED kits are usually designed the same way, with 2-4 lights, a junction box that distributes the power to the lights, and the control box which is mounted in the cabin so you can turn the lights on and off easily. This article will guide you on how to install a neon light kit on your car.

  • Note: Before installing the kit on the car, read the instructions and plug everything in an outside electrical source. Test to make sure the lights work before you go through the trouble of installing everything. You want to make sure the kit isn’t defective before you go through with installing it.

Part 1 of 3: Installing the lights

Materials Needed

  • Drill
  • Double sided automotive tape
  • Heat gun
  • Heat shrink tubing
  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Marker
  • Screwdriver
  • Silicone sealant
  • Solder
  • Soldering iron
  • Wire cutter
  • Wire stripper
  • Zip ties

  • Note: Refer to the kit’s instructions to get the correct size drill bit for the mounting brackets.

  • Note: You may not need all of these tools depending on what kind of kit you ended up buying. Most LED kits have the connectors already installed on the wires so you just need to plug everything together. If you end up buying a kit where you need to make the connections, you will need the heat gun, heat shrink tubing, soldering iron, solder, wire cutters, and wire strippers.

hand removing the negative terminal of the battery

Step 1: Disconnect the negative terminal of the battery. The battery will need to be off when we’re plugging the junction box and other cables into the car’s power.

car on jack stands lifting up the entire car

Step 2: Lift the car onto jack stands. On a flat, level surface, use your jack to lift the car and place jack stands underneath to hold the car up while you work underneath.

It is best to lift all four corners of the car so you have plenty of space to move around.

pinch weld beneath the car

Step 3: Locate some mounting locations. Hold the lights up to try and find some secure mounting locations.

Mounting locations will slightly vary from car to car, but in general, you will want to locate a flat surface that can accommodate the entire length of the light.

Mark some spots down for the brackets.

  • Warning: Make sure you don’t drill into something important when making the holes. The inside of the pinch weld usually works well, just keep the lights away from the lift points near the wheels. Also, make sure the lights aren’t near heat or any moving parts such as the suspension, exhaust, or driveshaft.

If you are using double sided tape to secure the lights, make sure that the surface is clean and dry before applying the lights onto the car. Dust and moisture will lessen the strength of the adhesive and may cause the lights to fall while in motion.

drilling into pinch weld

Step 4: Drill holes. After you’ve surveyed a location to mount the lights, use the drill to make the holes for the mounting brackets.

If using tape, apply a strip to the full length of the LEDs.

screwing in mounting brackets

Step 5: Screw in mounting brackets. Screw the mounts into the holes which you have just drilled.

Make sure to tighten them down so the lights are secured and will not move around.

neon lights installed in bracket

Step 6: Install light into brackets. When using mounting brackets, it is recommended that you use a zip tie on each bracket to help keep the light secure.

  • Tip: Orient the lights so that the cables are going to the front of the vehicle so you’ll have plenty of slack when hooking everything up.

If using tape, attach the lights to your clean, dry surface. Apply pressure onto the whole of the strip so that the whole light sticks.

Step 7: Repeat for all lights included. If you have multiple lights that you are installing, repeat this process for any other lights that you have.

You typically will want to go for symmetry, so have the lights at nearly identical spots beneath both sides of the car.

Part 2 of 3: Installing the junction box

junction box sitting on top of a battery underneath the hood

Step 1: Locate an area under the hood for the box. Like the lights, keep it away from heat and moving parts. The battery is usually a good spot to mount the box so that you are close to the power.

pulling lights up through engine

Step 2: Run the light’s power cables to the engine compartment. Use zip ties to secure any loose cables and keep them away from heat and movement again.

These have to plug into the junction box so route them so they end up near your chosen mounting spot.

hand holding tape and the junction box laying flat on the top of battery

Step 3: Mount the junction box. Make sure the surface is clean and dry before applying the tape. Using tape here means you can reposition the box if necessary and is safer than drilling into parts under the hood.

hands adding sealant to the wire

Step 4: Connect lights to the junction box. Plug in all the light’s power cables into the junction box. Use a thin layer of silicone sealant to help protect the circuit from water.

  • Tip: If you have to solder the connections, be sure to put a section of heat shrink tubing on the cable before you solder them together. A little silicone sealant can help protect these connections as well.

power cable coming from fuse box

Step 5: Connect the power cable for the whole system. This step will vary depending on how the light kit is designed.

Some kits will hook directly into the car’s battery with an inline fuse to protect the circuit. This kind of kit will likely have the power go into the junction box. If this is the case, go ahead and hook the power up.

If your light kit gets power through the fuse box, you will want to wait until the control box is setup to connect the power. If this is the case, skip this step for now until the control box is setup in the next part.

Part 3 of 3: Installing the control box

firewall hole

Step 1: Locate the hole in the firewall that goes to the interior of the car. Many cars will have a hole that connects the engine compartment and the interior of the car.

There should be a rubber grommet to protect from dust and noise. There should also be a hole in the grommet where you can stick a cable through it.

If there is no hole, you will have to create your own. Make sure it is big enough for the connector to pass through and make sure you don’t drill through anything important.

rubber grommet wrapped around control cable

Step 2: Remove the grommet and wrap around the control cable. Run the cable through the hole and replace the grommet.

Now we have our connection from inside the cabin to the junction box under the hood.

crontrol box mounted on cabin of vehicle

Step 3: Find a place to mount the control box. You’ll likely want it within arms reach while in the driver’s seat so that it is easy to turn on and off.

Secure it with some more double sided tape so it doesn’t move around.

  • Note: If you didn’t plug in the power cable earlier, go ahead and plug it in now. Like I mentioned, these kits use power from the fuse box so there is some circuit protection. Make sure to read the instructions and use the correct fuse otherwise the lights may not function properly.

hand securing the group cable under car

Step 4: Find a suitable location for the ground cable. Any unpainted metal underneath the car is usually a good source of ground.

You can also drill your own hole if you can’t find a bolt to undo to secure it to.

Step 5: Make any other necessary connections. Depending on the kit you bought, there may be some more connections that need to be made so follow the instructions to make sure everything is properly setup.

A common feature is an antenna so you can use a remote control to change the lights while outside the car.

Step 6: Double check all connections. Make sure all the connections are nice and snug and won’t fall out easily.

Check that all lights are connected to the junction box and that all power and ground cables are secured properly.

Make sure that the junction box and control box are held up sturdily before driving to avoid tearing.

reinstalling negative cable on battery

Step 7: Hook up the negative cable on the battery. This will restore electrical power to the car.

Step 8: Test the lights out. You can now try your new lights. Be sure to try all the different functions of the light to make sure everything is working as intended.

With the LED kit installed, your car is now ready to be shown off to the world! As mentioned before, it’s really important that you test the kit before going through with the installation to make sure that it will work. Completing this installation will give your car a new look that will likely turn other driver’s heads at car shows and on the road.

When going through this installation, if you notice any glaring electrical problems with your car, a certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your home or office to diagnose and repair your car for you.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Post a question and get free advice from our certified mechanics.

ASK A QUESTION

More related articles

P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the P0052 code means This code is seen when the Engine Control Module (ECM) tries to control the...
P0222 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle/Pedal Position Switch/Sensor B Circuit Low Input
P0222 code definition Throttle/Pedal Position Switch/Sensor B Circuit Low Input What the P0222 code means The manufacturer specifies a range of acceptable voltage to be produced from the throttle position...
P2422 OBD-II Trouble Code: Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP) Vent Valve Stuck Closed
Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC): P2422 P2422 code definition Evaporative Emissions Control System (EVAP) Vent Valve Stuck Closed Related Trouble Codes: P2441: EVAP Vent Valve Stuck Open EVAP trouble...


Related questions

Q: Can i put wheel spacers on my Yaris?

You can if you find ones specifically for your Toyota Yaris. Just be aware that these spacers set the wheel out wide and will cause premature wheel bearing failures. If you need assistance with the installation or run into any...

Q: Lights connected to the same fuse don't work

Hello. This is typically a failure in the headlamp switch or a bad ground connection. However, the most common issue I have found with this is the switch. I would typically start by accessing the back of the switch by...

Q: Back window decal

Generally most states prohibit items in the windows that obstruct the view of the driver. Depending on specifically where on the back window the decal is placed it may or may not be illegal. You will need to check with...