How to Replace a Brake Hose

Modern cars use a combination of metal lines and rubber hoses to contain and transfer the fluid that applies your brakes. The lines coming out of the brake master cylinder are made of metal to be strong and long lasting. Metal wouldn’t be able to cope with the movement of the wheels, so we use a rubber hose that can move and bend with the suspension.

Each wheel typically has it’s own segment of rubber hose to deal with the movement of the suspension and wheel. Over time, dust and dirt will eat away at the hoses and eventually they can start leaking. Inspect the hoses on a regular basis to keep your car safe to drive.

Part 1 of 3: Removing the old hose

Materials Needed

  • Drain pan
  • Gloves
  • Hammer
  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Line wrench
  • Pliers
  • Rags
  • Safety glasses
  • Wrenches

  • Note: You’ll need a few different sizes of wrenches. One is for the connection going into the caliper, typically around 15/16 mm. You’ll need a wrench for the bleeder valve, typically 9 mm. The line wrench is for the connection from the hose to the metal brake line. These connections can be tight if they haven’t been changed for a few years. If you use a normal, open-ended wrench to loosen them, there is a good chance you’ll round off the connections which will mean much more work. The flares on the line wrench make sure that you have a nice, tight grip on the connection while loosening so that the wrench doesn’t slide off.

car on jack stands

Step 1: Lift the car onto jack stands. On a flat and level surface, jack the car up and place it on some jack stands so it will not fall while the wheels are removed.

Block off any wheels that are left on the ground if you are not replacing all the hoses.

access brake hose

Step 2: Remove the wheel. We’ll need the wheel out of the way to access the brake hose and fittings.

fluid level master cylinder

Step 3: Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder. Make sure you have a good amount of fluid in the reservoir because fluid will start leaking as soon as the lines are disconnected.

If the master cylinder runs out of fluid, it will take longer to fully bleed the system of air.

  • Note: Be sure to put the cap back on the reservoir. This will greatly reduce the amount of fluid that comes out of the lines when they are disconnected.

cracking open top connection

Step 4: Use your line wrench and crack open the top connection. Don’t undo it completely, we just want to be able to unscrew it quickly later on when we actually take the hose out.

Lightly tighten it again so fluid doesn’t leak out.

  • Tip: Loosen the connection while it is still mounted. The mount is designed to prevent the hose or connection from twisting and it will hold the connection in place while you loosen it.

  • Tip: Use some penetrating oil if the connection looks dirty and rusty. This will greatly help getting the connections loose.

cracking open bottom connection

Step 5: Crack open the connection going into the brake caliper. Again, don’t unscrew it all the way, we just want to make sure it will come out easily later on.

removing mounting clip

Step 6: Remove the mounting bracket clip. This small metal piece should just pull out of the bracket. Don’t bend or damage the clip otherwise you’ll have to replace it.

  • Note: At this point, make sure your drain pan is set up underneath and have a rag or two nearby to help with any spills for the next few steps.

unscrewing top connection

Step 7: Unscrew the top connection completely. The top connection should come undone with no problem since we’ve already cracked it open.

Remove the connection from the mounting bracket as well.

  • Note: Brake fluid will start coming out as soon as it’s open a little bit so have the drain pan and rags prepared.

unscrewing hose from caliper

Step 8: Unscrew the hose out of of the caliper. The whole hose will rotate and can fling brake fluid around so make sure you have safety glasses on.

Make sure no fluid gets onto the brake rotor, pads, or paint.

Have your new hose ready to go as we want this transfer to be quick.

  • Note: Brake calipers tend to be very dirty so use a rag and clean the area around the connection before undoing it completely. We don’t want any dirt or dust going into the caliper housing.

Part 2 of 3: Installing the new hose

new hose into caliper

Step 1: Screw the new hose into the caliper. You’ll put it together the opposite way you took it apart. Screw it in until it bottoms out - don’t worry about tightening it yet.

  • Warning: Be careful when threading the connections. If you damage the threads on the caliper, the whole caliper will need to be replaced. Go slow and make sure the threads are lined up properly.

seating the top connection into the mount

Step 2: Reseat the top connection into the mounting bracket. Line up the slots so the hose can’t rotate.

Don’t put the clip back in just yet, we want some play in the hose so we can get everything lined up correctly.

tightening the top connection

Step 3: Retighten the nut on the top connection. Use your fingers to get it started then a line wrench to tighten it slightly.

tapping mounting clip back into place

Step 4: Use hammer to tap in mounting clips. You don’t need a sledge, but a little weight can help get these on easier.

A couple light taps should get it back into place.

  • Warning: Take care not to damage the lines when swinging the hammer.

tightening down connections

Step 5: Fully tighten down both connections. Use one hand to tighten them down. They should be snug, not as tight as possible.

wiping down with a rag

Step 6: Use a rag to clean up any left over fluid. Brake fluid can damage other components, namely rubber and paint, so we want to make sure we clean everything.

Step 7: Repeat for all hoses that need to be replaced.

Part 3 of 3: Putting everything back together

checking brake fluid levels

Step 1: Check the fluid level in the master cylinder. Before we start bleeding the system of air, we want to make sure we have a good amount of fluid in the reservoir.

The level shouldn’t be too much lower as long as your transfers were quick.

bleeding brakes

Step 2: Bleed the brakes of air. You should only have to bleed the lines that you replaced. Check the fluid level after bleeding each caliper so that you don’t run the master cylinder dry.

  • Tip: Have a friend pump the brakes while you open and close the bleeder valve. Makes life much easier.

Step 3: Check for leaks. With the wheel still removed, pump the brakes hard a few times and inspect the connections for any leaks.

putting wheel back on

Step 4: Put the wheel back on. Make sure you tighten the wheel to the correct torque specification. This can be found online or in the owner’s manual.

Step 5: Time for test drive. Test the brakes in an empty street or parking lot first before going into traffic. The brakes should feel hard since we just bled the system. If they are soft or spongy there is likely still air trapped in the lines and you’ll need to bleed them again.

Replacing the hose typically doesn’t require any expensive special tools, so you can save yourself some money by doing the work at home. If you are experiencing any difficulties with this job, our certified technicians are always available to assist you.


Next Step

Schedule Brake Hose Replacement

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Brake Hose Replacement. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews... LEARN MORE

SEE PRICING & SCHEDULING

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Recent Brake Hose Replacement reviews

Excellent Rating

(123)

Rating Summary
115
5
0
0
3
115
5
0
0
3

Jason

32 years of experience
412 reviews
Jason
32 years of experience
Ford F-150 V8-5.0L - Brake Hose Replacement (Passenger Side Front) - Surprise, Arizona
Jason is very professional. He’s a great mechanic and I feel his work and recommended repairs can be trusted. He will be THE requested mechanic that we use moving forward.
Ford Explorer - Brake Hose Replacement (Driver Side Front, Passenger Side Front) - San Jose, California
Jason was a lifesaver. He is very knowledgeable at his job and I really want to thanked him for explaining all the issues I had with my car and what to look for. Jason gets a high five and a 10 for his great service today with my car.

Genaro

13 years of experience
287 reviews
Genaro
13 years of experience
Toyota Camry V6-3.0L - Brake Hose Replacement (Driver Side Front) - Chicago, Illinois
Genaro was absolutely great. He actually called to see if he could come earlier than scheduled, and I said fine by me. First day was the $70 diagnostic. He didn't have the brake hose, so he had to come back the next day. Cost me around $140 to replace it. Showed me a bunch of stuff that needed to be taken care of and didn't need to be taken care of. He confirmed everything that other shops said, including pricing. The best part is not that he's honest, but you can actually sit and watch every little thing that he does. What happens when you go to a shop and leave it for the day or sit in the waiting room??? Did they actually do the transmission flush? Radiator flush? Spark plug change??? Now to be honest, I don't think you really save very much with this service, which you should because this service doesn't have the rent overhead of a standalone shop. I guess the convenience makes up for it. What I DID get was a mechanic who CAME TO ME, fast, and was knowledgable, polite, and trustworthy. Am considering hiring him again before his scheduled move to another state. Very well done, Genaro. You da man!!!! I'm a little bit hesitant to give him a "10" because he's only done one job for me, but I'm gonna give it to him anyway because he was so nice.
Hyundai Elantra - Brake Hose Replacement (Driver Side Front) - Chicago, Illinois
I wanted to change brake hoses, as part of troubleshooting a leak. Didn't change the rear because he informed me that it would break the brake line. Very knowledgeable.

Theodore

16 years of experience
1437 reviews
Theodore
16 years of experience
Nissan Murano V6-3.5L - Brake Hose Replacement (Driver Side Rear) - Renton, Washington
Theo was quick, professional and honest. As a woman getting my car fixed he made me feel comfortable and confident with the service he was providing. I needed all my brakes and rotors replaced, then the tubing was damaged from the previous mechanic. He drove over an hour to grab the new pipe for me.

Elias

14 years of experience
60 reviews
Elias
14 years of experience
Mercedes-Benz ML350 V6-3.5L - Brake Hose Replacement (Driver Side Front) - Bronx, New York
I am very happy with Elias and I loved his work. He is very respectful a d I love the fact that he was willing to accommodate me despite the bad weather.

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

Related articles

How to Bleed Car Brakes
Bleeding brakes removes trapped air from the car brake system and flushes old fluid and contaminants. Bleed brakes when the brake pedal is spongy.
The Difference Between Power Brake Booster & Vacuum Brake Booster
A power brake booster, or hydro-boost power brake system, uses hydraulics while a vacuum brake booster uses a vacuum to stop your vehicle.
How Long Do Brake Pads Last?
How How long can brake pads last? Brake pads last from 25,000 miles to 70,000 miles depending on their design and material. Brake pads are part of the braking system of every vehicle. Designed to handle high friction, when the...

Related questions

I started my car, but not all the way and pressed on the brakes a few times, and felt the brakes lock up a little bit. Turned on m

You should first check brake fluid to see if it is low on fluid? If not low then your master cylinder has failed and will need to be replaced.

What is the four-wheel anti-lock brake system?

You have two braking systems on your car – the standard system that kicks in when you press the brake pedal under normal conditions and a four-wheel anti-lock brake system (ABS). The ABS works only under certain conditions. It’s tied...

Brake noise

Hi there! Noise when braking usually indicates that there is low friction material. There is a little noise maker that will begin to scrape the rotor when the pad level becomes low. This noise serves as an audible warning to...

How can we help?

Our service team is available 7 days a week, Monday - Friday from 6 AM to 5 PM PST, Saturday - Sunday 7 AM - 4 PM PST.

1 (855) 347-2779 · hi@yourmechanic.com