Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

How Long Does a Heater Hose Last?

heater hose

The engine of your car produces a lot of heat. Making sure that the heat that the engine produces does not affect its overall level of functionality is the job of the heater hoses. As the coolant in the engine heats up, it will be transported through the heater hoses. The heater hoses will take the coolant through the heater core, where it will be cooled down and the excess heat will be dispersed outside of the vehicle. These hoses will have to work on a constant basis in order for the engine to remain at the right temperature.

The hoses on a vehicle will usually last anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 miles. Most of the bypass and heater hoses on a car are made of rubber. The rubber will eventually dry out and will become very brittle. Allowing these worn hoses to stay on a car will usually result in them bursting open and allowing the coolant in the engine to leak out. Usually, the heater hoses will not be inspected during the routine maintenance of a car. This means that the only time that the hoses are handled is when they are damaged and in need of replacement.

Getting the heater hoses on a car replaced is not easy and will usually require a professional to do the job. A bad heater hose will cause lower levels of engine coolant, which can lead to the car overheating and more damage being done. Addressing the issues with a car’s heater hoses is important to maintaining a high level of functionality. A properly working cooling system is a vital part of an engine running at the right temperature.

The following are some of the things that you may notice when your car’s heater hoses are in need of repair or replacement:

  • The engine is running hot on a regular basis
  • The engine will not get to the right temperature
  • There is fluid leaking from the radiator

Having high-quality replacement heater hoses put on will help to reduce the amount of trouble you have in the future with your cooling system. Be sure to speak with the professionals about the best types of hoses to put on the vehicle.

The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details
Icon-warranty_badge-02

Skip the repair shop, our top-rated mechanics come to you.

At your home or office

Choose from 600+ repair, maintenance & diagnostic services. Our top-rated mechanics bring all parts & tools to your location.

Fair & transparent pricing

See labor & parts costs upfront, so you can book with confidence.

12-month, 12,000-mile warranty

Our services are backed by a 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty for your peace of mind.

Get A Quote

Need Help With Your Car?

Our certified mobile mechanics make house calls in over 2,000 U.S. cities. Fast, free online quotes for your car repair.

GET A QUOTE

More related articles

P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the...
How to Buy Fuel Treatments
Adding a fuel additive to your gas tank when you fill up is one way to clean vital engine parts of deposits, improve the performance of your engine,...
Rules of the Road For Iowa Drivers
Driving on the roads requires knowledge of the rules, many of which are based on common sense and courtesy. However, even though you know the rules in...


Related questions

Q: Temperature problems

Hello there, there are many faults that will cause your 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe's temperature gauge to only rise to 1/2 and the heat not function. The most common cause is air stuck in the cooling system, this commonly happens after...

Q: Overheated and car is cool now. It cranks when I turn the key but does not want to start.

Look around the engine compartment to see where the leak is coming from when you fill up the radiator with coolant / water. Check the radiator, water pump, freeze plugs on the engine, all of the coolant hoses. If you...

Q: Hesitation on take off

A hesitation present during acceleration is usually a sign of a fuel delivery or fuel ratio problem. Naturally, this will be enhanced when the AC is on since the AC increases the load on the vehicle's engine more than normal....