Symptoms of a Bad or Failing Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor)

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Cost of Replacing a Bad or Failing Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor)

Common signs of manifold absolute pressure sensor problems include excessive fuel consumption, lack of power, and failing an emissions test. Our certified technicians can come to you and diagnose the problem. You will receive a $30 credit towards any follow-up repairs that result from the diagnostic. Following are example prices for Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor) Replacement. Click on the button below to get an upfront quote for your car.

Cars Estimate Parts Cost Labor Cost Savings Average Dealer Price
2004 Pontiac Grand Am $144 $74.18 $70.00 20% $181.68
2008 Dodge Sprinter 2500 $179 $109.18 $70.00 17% $216.68
2011 Chevrolet Malibu $158 $88.38 $70.00 19% $195.88
2013 Mini Cooper $232 $162.38 $70.00 13% $269.88
2009 Acura MDX $151 $80.99 $70.00 19% $188.49
2014 Porsche Panamera $217 $146.98 $70.00 14% $254.48
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How to Diagnose a Bad or Failing Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor)?

manifold pressure sensor

The Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor is used by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) for engine load input. The PCM uses this input, as well as others, to calculate the correct amount of fuel to inject into the cylinders.

The MAP sensor measures the absolute pressure inside the intake manifold of the engine. At sea level, atmospheric pressure is about 14.7 psi (pounds per square inch). When the engine is off, the absolute pressure inside the intake equals atmospheric pressure, so the MAP will indicate about 14.7 psi. At a perfect vacuum, the MAP sensor will read 0 psi. When the engine is running, the downward motion of the pistons create a vacuum inside the intake manifold (For the purposes of engine control, when a technician says vacuum, what they are really saying is pressure that is less than atmospheric pressure). With a running engine, intake manifold vacuum usually runs around 18 - 20 “Hg (inches of mercury). At 20 “Hg, the MAP sensor will indicate about 5 psi. This is because the MAP sensor measures “absolute” pressure, based on a perfect vacuum, rather than atmospheric pressure.

A failed MAP sensor has serious implications on fuel control, vehicle tailpipe emissions and fuel economy. Symptoms of a bad or failing MAP sensor include:

1. Excessive fuel consumption

A MAP sensor that measures high intake manifold pressure indicates high engine load to the PCM. This results in an increase of fuel being injected into the engine. This, in turn, decreases your overall fuel economy. It also increases the amount of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from your vehicle to the surrounding atmosphere. Hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are some of the chemical components of smog.

2. Lack of power

A MAP sensor that measures low intake manifold pressure indicates low engine load to the PCM. The PCM responds by reducing the amount of fuel being injected into the engine. While you may notice an increase in fuel economy, you will also notice that your engine isn’t as powerful as it was before. By reducing the fuel into the engine, combustion chamber temperatures are increased. This increases the amount of NOx (oxides of nitrogen) production within the engine. NOx is also a chemical component of smog.

3. Failed emissions test

A bad MAP sensor will cause your vehicle to fail an emissions test. Your tailpipe emissions may show a high level of hydrocarbons, high NOx production, low CO2, or a high level of carbon monoxide.

A properly trained technician like those at YourMechanic are capable of diagnosing and repairing a failed MAP sensor.

MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor
fuel system
low engine pressure

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Recent Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor) Replacement reviews

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YourMechanic Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP Sensor) Replacement Service

Average Rating

4.8/5

Number of Reviews

53

Rating Summary
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Gregory

28 years of experience
141 reviews
Gregory
28 years of experience
Greg was very pleasant to work with and explained everything he was doing.
2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE - MANIFOLD ABSOLUTE PRESSURE SENSOR (MAP SENSOR) - LITTLETON, COLORADO

Michael

11 years of experience
57 reviews
Michael
11 years of experience
He took his time to make sure that my car was working before he left and I really appreciate that you are the best Michael thank you
2005 JEEP LIBERTY - MANIFOLD ABSOLUTE PRESSURE SENSOR (MAP SENSOR) - NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

Howard

27 years of experience
79 reviews
Howard
27 years of experience
Great
2007 DODGE RAM 1500 - MANIFOLD ABSOLUTE PRESSURE SENSOR (MAP SENSOR) - SNELLVILLE, GEORGIA

Joseph

30 years of experience
432 reviews
Joseph
30 years of experience
Remain professional and got the job done.
2010 HYUNDAI SONATA - MANIFOLD ABSOLUTE PRESSURE SENSOR (MAP SENSOR) - DALLAS, TEXAS

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