Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement at your home or office in Tualatin.

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Our certified mobile mechanics can come to your home or office 7 days a week between 7 AM and 9 PM.

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How much does Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement cost in Tualatin?

It depends on the type of car you drive and the auto repair shop you go to in Tualatin. Our mechanics in Tualatin are mobile, which means they don't have the overhead that repair shops have. They provide you convenience by coming to your home or office in Tualatin.

Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement pricing for various cars

CarsEstimateParts CostLabor CostSavingsAverage Dealer Price
2014 Dodge Durango$213$118.31$94.995%$225.81
2008 Dodge Magnum$323$47.85$275.4710%$359.60
2006 Kia Spectra5$694$228.44$465.458%$755.19
2011 Mercedes-Benz G550$152$28.15$123.489%$167.90
2010 Cadillac CTS$317$145.77$170.986%$339.27
2013 Ford Mustang$211$20.98$189.9810%$235.98

Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement Service

What is the Front Crankshaft Seal all about?

A number of mechanisms must work together to make your vehicle move forward. One of the most important is the crankshaft, which converts rotary into linear motion; i.e., it transforms the force created by the engine's pistons moving up and down into a force that moves in a circular motion that causes a car’s wheel to turn. Enclosed in what’s called a crankcase—the largest cavity in the engine block, just below the cylinders—the crankshaft must be completely lubricated, essentially submerged in oil, to spin nearly friction-free and do its job properly.

Consequently, there are seals located at either end of the crankshaft that allow it to spin freely and keep engine oil from escaping the engine block, as well as prevent contaminants and other debris from entering and causing damage to the mechanism. Since there are two ends of the crankshaft, there are two types of seals: the front crankshaft seal and the rear crankshaft seal, also known as the front main and rear main seals.

Keep in mind:

  • Loss of oil will eventually cause serious internal engine damage.
  • Inspect the sealing surface of the crankshaft or the crankshaft pulley (depending on the engine design) for damage when replacing the crankshaft seal.
  • Oil degrades rubber components.

How it's done:

  • The vehicle is raised and supported on jack stands
  • The crankshaft damper and timing belt is removed
  • The crankshaft seal is removed and a new one installed
  • The timing belt and cover along with crankshaft damper is reinstalled
  • The engine accessory belts are installed and the vehicle is lowered off of the jack stands

Our recommendation:

One of the most important parts of your car, crankshaft seals are typically made from a durable material, such as a synthetic rubber or silicone, designed to handle the extreme pressure and temperatures as well as the caustic chemicals in your engine oil. Because they are exposed to such abuse, main seals are subject to a lot of wear and tear. And whether you are talking a front or rear main seal, replacement is the only cure when one malfunctions.

The good news is that the seals are relatively inexpensive components. The bad news is that neither is easy to replace.

Front seal: The front seal is located behind the main pulley that drives all the belts, which is, of course, always spinning. The main pulley throws any leaking oil out in a big circle. It can get thrown up on the alternator, steering pump, belts, in short anything attached to the front of the engine and cause a real mess and eventually some serious damage. Consequently, it has to be removed along with many of the components attached to the front of the block to replace the front main seal.

Rear seal: The rear crankshaft seal is placed along with the transmission; therefore, the process of replacing it requires the removal of transmission, as well as the clutch and flywheel assembly. This is a very involved job.

What common symptoms indicate you may need to replace the Front Crankshaft Seal?

  • Oil leaking from the front crank pulley.
  • Oil dripping from the bottom of the clutch housing, where the block and transmission meet.
  • Clutch slip caused by oil spraying on the clutch.

How important is this service?

Letting either crankshaft seal continue to leak can be detrimental to your vehicle’s continued operation. Besides the maladies caused by driving around with little to no oil flowing in the engine, the faulty seal will be spread oil through the engine bay and undercarriage of your car as you drive, a mess that is difficult to clean up and can be a fire hazard. Replacing is better addressed sooner than later.


Recent Front Crankshaft Seal Replacement reviews in Tualatin

Excellent Rating

(204)

Rating Summary
189
6
3
1
5
189
6
3
1
5

Michael

14 years of experience
55 reviews
Michael
14 years of experience
Good Mechanic.. Very knowledgeable of is work and friendly.

Charles

27 years of experience
22 reviews
Charles
27 years of experience
Charles was very concerned to make sure I was aware of everything that he was doing.

Erick

10 years of experience
182 reviews
Erick
10 years of experience
Erick is a very honest professional, goes out of his way to make sure the job gets done to your satisfaction.

Alan

20 years of experience
44 reviews
Alan
20 years of experience
Alan was excellent . He was professional, friendly and did a wonderful job ! I will certainly spread the word about your company. The communication was awesome on both end's. That is important to me. I don't think I will ever go to another company for anything else on my car. I am just very,very pleased, and impressed with the whole job. Thank you so much, Alan

Joshua

27 years of experience
709 reviews
Joshua
27 years of experience
I bought my Avalon on last February 10th. The car is in so clean and mint condition by considering its age. However, I've noticed that the previous owner did not change timing belt and water pump for over 7 years. So at first, I made some quotes with different shops around my town. And obviously, they were asking too much of money on parts and labor to service timing belt and water pump. All of a sudden, I realized that I've serviced my previous car with YourMechanic before. Then, I made a quote, and I decided to make appointment today morning. In my opinion, Joshua is the most professional, friendly, and knowledgeable mechanics I've experienced. He was on time, completed the service way faster than I expected! Since he serviced my vehicle today, I would definitely make another appointment when the service is needed. Glad my Avalon found her doctor today!

Chris

15 years of experience
312 reviews
Chris
15 years of experience
A real Professional, On time ,Completed the job as Quoted . Great Customer Service, Thanks

Travis

13 years of experience
582 reviews
Travis
13 years of experience
very personable, respectful and job well done!!

Damian

11 years of experience
430 reviews
Damian
11 years of experience
great mechanic, friendly disposition,

Sergio

45 years of experience
46 reviews
Sergio
45 years of experience
This man is a professional. Very detailed and thorough Will tell you exactly what's going on with your car. Test drive and make sure your issue is fixed Constantly keep you updated Gives a detailed report with pictures every step of the way When I have any more issues with Jeanette I will definitely call Sergio.

Theodore

16 years of experience
1592 reviews
Theodore
16 years of experience
Theodore was meticulous and thorough...he was professional, on time and pleasant. He had several recommendations that I plan to follow up on soon. He provided me total confidence with his work and his manner. I think I have found my regular mechanic. Thank you.

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