Skip the auto shop - Our mechanics make house calls

Q: Why won't my car start

asked by on

I took my car to a shop the other day and ran a scan, the car showed that the problem was the Crankshaft Position sensor. I replaced the crankshaft position sensor on the car and it ran fine for a day, now I am back at the same problem. The car makes a static noise and will not crank over even with the new part then smoke comes from where the sensor is, please help.

My car has 117000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: We need to keep in mind that when there is ...

We need to keep in mind that when there is a code, it wasn’t intended to indicate the part that needs to be replaced, rather it indicates the system that is malfunctioning. Granted, with many systems, there are patterns that emerge, and most will resort to replacing what is the most common failure for a given code. In your case, I suspect you have a wiring problem with the harness that is connected to the crank sensor.

When the sensor was replaced the first time, this wiring was likely disturbed and a good connection was made again. After a few days, the harness relaxed back to the state that originally caused the problem and now you see smoke coming from that area.

A direct visual inspection of the harness and sensor should be done by doing some disassembly. Look for damaged and melted wires. The internal metal core will be exposed. The plastic on the outside of the metal core will be cracked or melted.

The static noise is likely a result of the same wiring issue. Either way, the static came along with the initial failure and it will likely go away after the vehicle is fixed. If not, then you most likely have another issue. If you want to have this looked at by an expert, a certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your home or office to diagnose your starting issue and pinpoint what repair is needed.

Was this answer helpful?

Need advice from certified mechanic? Get help now!

Over 1000 mechanics are ready to answer your question.
The statements expressed above are only for informational purposes and should be independently verified. Please see our terms of service for more details

Get an instant quote for your car

Our certified mechanics come to you ・Backed by 12-month, 12,000-mile guarantee・Fair and transparent pricing

Get a quote

What others are asking

Q: Wheel studs breaking off when changing tire

Hey there: Thanks for writing in to YourMechanic.com. Breaking a wheel stud is commonly not caused by the way you're removing them, or the tool you are using. Lug nuts are supposed to go onto a stud smoothly, and come...

Q: Charging system failure.

Hello There! This is a sign of a bad voltage regulator as indicated by the test they ran with everything still installed on the vehicle. The voltage regulator is a unit that regulates the charging of the battery by the...

Q: What's the difference between a racing crankshaft and a stock one?

Most of the time it is unnecessary to use a racing crank in a street motor, unless you are planning on building a 700HP+ motor. The racing cranks are stronger, better balanced, more aerodynamic, and also much more expensive. Most...

Related articles

P0052 OBD-II Trouble Code: HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0052 code definition HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1) What the P0052 code means This code is seen when the Engine Control Module (ECM) tries to control the...
P2428 OBD-II Trouble Code: Exhaust Gas Temperature Too High Bank 1
P2428 code definition A P2428 trouble code signifies that the PCM has detected a problem in the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit in bank 1, which subsequently contains the number one...
P2103 OBD-II Trouble Code: Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit High
P2103 means there is a fault with the throttle actuator control motor circuit, likely due to a defective electrical component or part.