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Q: Two hoses that lead nowhere

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I have found two hoses that lead to nothing. They may have snapped off after I replaced the started but im not sure. One starts at the top of the throttle body and the other starts off of something that is below the master cylinder. I am unable to find the name of these hoses anywhere.

My car has 173000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

A: I’ve spent many an hour scratching my head ...

I’ve spent many an hour scratching my head over just this kind of problem. One of the hazards of working on older cars is having hoses and fittings break off while you’re trying to get to something else. I know it’s not much help now, but these days everybody has a camera in their pocket, so it can be helpful to take a few photos of the engine compartment before you start working. As for the hoses you’re contending with, I’m sure you would have mentioned if there were coolant coming out of them. And if the car runs and idles well, they are probably not carrying vacuum, so I’ll guess that they are part of the evaporative emissions system. Look for a part that looks like a small coffee can somewhere under the hood, probably around the master cylinder or tucked away in a dark corner. You may find the other end of the hoses there. If you can’t find where these hoses go, don’t leave them hanging. contact your mechanic and have a technician come to your home and sort out these hoses for you.

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